FORM 10-K

                            SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
                                  WASHINGTON, D.C.  20549

(Mark One)

[X]                ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
                              SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 1993
                                            OR
[ ]              TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
                              SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from _______________ to _______________

Commission file number 1-225

                                KIMBERLY-CLARK CORPORATION
                  (Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

          Delaware                                        39-0394230  
(State or other jurisdiction of                        (I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization)                        Identification No.)

P. O. Box 619100, Dallas, Texas                          75261-9100
(Address of principal executive offices)                 (Zip Code)

Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (214) 830-1200

                Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

                                                      Name of each exchange 
                Title of each class                    on which registered  
- ------------------------------------------------    ------------------------
Common Stock - $1.25 Par Value; Preferred Share      New York Stock Exchange
  Purchase Rights                                    Chicago Stock Exchange 
                                                     Pacific Stock Exchange 


      Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all
reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the
Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months
(or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to
file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing
requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes     X    .  No          .

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers
pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein,
and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's
knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incor-
porated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any
amendment to this Form 10-K. [X]

As of March 18, 1994, 161,014,091 shares of common stock were
outstanding, and the aggregate market value of the common stock
on such date (based on the closing price of these shares on the
New York Stock Exchange) of Kimberly-Clark Corporation held by
nonaffiliates was approximately $9,138 million.

                           (Continued)

<PAGE>
FACING SHEET
(Continued)


                                                                
Documents Incorporated By Reference

Kimberly-Clark Corporation's 1993 Annual Report to Stockholders
and 1994 Proxy Statement contain much of the information
required in this Form 10-K, and portions of those documents are
incorporated by reference from the applicable sections of those
reports.  The following chart identifies the sections of the
Corporation's 1993 Annual Report on Form 10-K which incorporate
by reference portions of the Corporation's 1993 Annual Report
to Stockholders or portions of the 1994 Proxy Statement.  The
Items of this Form 10-K, where applicable, specify which
portions of such documents are incorporated by reference.  The
portions of such documents that are not incorporated by
reference herein shall not be deemed to be filed with the
Commission as part of this Form 10-K.


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

   Document of Which Portions                                   Parts of this Form 10-K
  are Incorporated by Reference                                  in Which Incorporated           
- ------------------------------------------------     -----------------------------------------------
<S>                                                  <C>
1993 Annual Report to Stockholders                    Part I
  (Year ended December 31, 1993)                        Item 1.  Business


                                                      Part II

                                                        Item 5.  Market for the Registrant's
                                                          Common Stock and Related Stockholder
                                                          Matters


                                                        Item 7.  Management's Discussion and
                                                          Analysis of Financial Condition and
                                                          Results of Operation


                                                        Item 8.  Financial Statements and
                                                          Supplementary Data


                                                      Part IV

                                                        Item 14.  Exhibits, Financial Statement
                                                          Schedules, and Reports on Form 8-K


1994 Proxy Statement                                  Part III

                                                        Item 10.  Directors and Executive
                                                          Officers of the Registrant


                                                        Item 11.  Executive Compensation


                                                        Item 12.  Security Ownership of
                                                          Certain Beneficial Owners and
                                                          Management


                                                        Item 13.  Certain Relationships and
                                                          Related Transactions

</TABLE>


<PAGE>

PART I


ITEM 1.  BUSINESS

Kimberly-Clark Corporation was incorporated in Delaware in
1928.  As used in Items 1, 2 and 7 of this Form 10-K Annual
Report, the term "Corporation" refers to Kimberly-Clark
Corporation and its consolidated subsidiaries.  In the
remainder of this Form 10-K Annual Report, the terms "Kimberly-
Clark" or "Corporation" refer to Kimberly-Clark Corporation.

Financial information about product classes and results, and
foreign and domestic operations, and information about
principal products and markets of the Corporation, contained
under the caption "Management's Discussion and Analysis" and in
Note 12 to the Financial Statements contained in the 1993
Annual Report to Stockholders, are incorporated in this Item 1
by reference.

Description of the Corporation.  Kimberly-Clark is principally
engaged in the manufacturing and marketing throughout the world
of a wide range of products for personal, business and
industrial uses.  Most of these products are made from natural
and synthetic fibers using advanced technologies in absorbency,
fibers and nonwovens.

The Corporation's products and services are segmented into
three classes.

Class I includes tissue products for household, commercial,
institutional and industrial uses; infant, child, feminine and
incontinence care products; industrial and commercial wipers;
health care products; and related products. Class I products
are sold under a variety of well-known brand names, including
Kleenex, Huggies, Pull-Ups, Kotex, New Freedom, Lightdays,
Depend, Poise, Hi-Dri, Delsey, Spenco, Kimguard and Kimwipes.

Products for home use are sold through supermarkets, mass
merchandisers, drugstores, warehouse clubs, home health care
stores, variety stores, department stores and other retail
outlets, as well as to wholesalers.  Other products in this
class are sold to distributors, converters and end-users.

Pulp produced by the Corporation, including amounts sold to
other companies, is included in Class I, except for pulp
manufactured for newsprint and certain specialty papers which
is included in Class II.

Class II includes newsprint, printing papers, premium business
and correspondence papers, tobacco industry papers and
products, technical papers, and related products.  

Newsprint and groundwood printing papers are sold directly to
newspaper publishers and commercial printers.  Other papers and
specialty products in this class are sold directly to users, 
converters, manufacturers, publishers and printers, and through 
paper merchants, brokers, sales agents and other resale agencies.
                            

<PAGE>
P
ART I
(Continued)


                                                                
ITEM 1.  BUSINESS (Continued)

Class III includes aircraft services, commercial air
transportation and other products and services.

The Corporation owns various patents and trademarks registered
domestically and in certain foreign countries.  The Corporation
considers the patents and trademarks which it owns and the
trademarks under which it sells certain of its products, in
each instance in the aggregate, to be material to its business. 
Consequently, the Corporation seeks patent and trademark
protection by all available means, including registration.  A
partial list of the Corporation's trademarks is included under
the caption "Trademarks" contained in the 1993 Annual Report to
Stockholders and is incorporated herein by reference.

EMPLOYEES.  In its worldwide consolidated operations, the
Corporation had 42,131 employees as of December 31, 1993.

RAW MATERIALS.  Cellulose fibers in the form of wood pulp are
the primary raw material for the Corporation's paper and tissue
products and are important components in disposable diapers,
training pants, feminine pads and incontinence care products. 
Certain specialty papers are manufactured with other cellulose
fibers such as flax straw and cotton.  Large amounts of
secondary and recycled fibers are also consumed, primarily in
tissue products.  Superabsorbent materials are important
components in disposable diapers, training pants and
incontinence care products.  Polypropylene and other synthetics
are primary raw materials for manufacturing nonwoven fabrics
which are used in disposable diapers, training pants, feminine
pads, incontinence and health care products and industrial
wipers.  Most secondary fibers and all synthetics are
purchased.  Wood pulp and nonwood cellulose fibers are produced
by the Corporation and purchased from others.  The Corporation
considers the supply of such raw materials to be adequate to
meet the needs of its businesses.

For its worldwide consolidated operations, the Corporation's
pulp mills at Coosa Pines, Alabama, and Terrace Bay, Ontario,
had the capacity to supply about two-thirds of the 1993 wood
pulp requirements for products other than newsprint.  The
Corporation's newsprint mill at Coosa Pines produces
substantially all of its own pulp requirements.

The Corporation owns or controls 5.1 million acres of
forestland in North America, primarily as a source of fiber for
pulp production.  Approximately .4 million acres are owned and 
4.7 million acres, principally in Canada, are held under long-term 
Crown rights or leases.

Certain states have adopted laws and entered into agreements
with publishers requiring newspapers sold in such states to
contain specified amounts of recycled paper.  The Corporation
provides certain newspaper publishers with newsprint containing
specified amounts of recycled paper.

COMPETITION.  The Corporation competes in numerous domestic and
foreign markets.  The number of competitors and the Corpora-
tion's competitive positions in those markets vary.  In
general, in the sale of its principal products, the Corporation
faces strong competition from other manufacturers, some of
which are larger and more diversified than the Corporation. 
The Corporation has one major competitor, and several regional
competitors, in its disposable diaper business and several
major competitors in its household and other tissue-based
products, and feminine and incontinence care products
businesses.


<PAGE>

During 1993, in the U.S., private label and economy branded
competitors continued to expand distribution of their
disposable training pants nationally in competition with the
Corporation's training pants business, and, in the fourth
quarter, a major competitor initiated regional introductions of
a branded training pant.  In foreign markets, the Corporation
has encountered increased competition and expects to encounter
significant competition in connection with its introduction of
training pants and diapers in Europe.  Depending on the
characteristics of the market involved, the Corporation com-
petes on the basis of product quality and performance, price,
service, packaging, distribution, advertising and promotion.

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT.  At year-end 1993, approximately
1,200 of the Corporation's employees were engaged in research
and development activities and were located in Neenah,
Wisconsin; Roswell, Georgia; Coosa Pines, Alabama; Troy, Ohio;
Munising, Michigan; Waco, Texas; the United Kingdom; and
France.  A major portion of total research and development
expenditures is directed toward new or improved personal care,
health care, household products, and nonwoven materials. 
Consolidated research and development expenditures were $158.5
million in 1993, $156.1 million in 1992 and $148.8 million in
1991.

ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS.  Capital expenditures for environmental
controls to meet legal requirements and otherwise relating to
the protection of the environment at the Corporation's
facilities in the United States are estimated to be $54 million
in 1994 and $15 million in 1995.  Such expenditures are not
expected to have a material effect on the Corporation's total
capital expenditures, consolidated earnings or competitive
position; however, these estimates could be modified as a
result of changes in the Corporation's plans, changes in legal
requirements or other factors.  

RISKS FOR FOREIGN OPERATIONS.  The products of the Corporation
and its equity companies are made in 21 countries outside the
U.S.  Consumer products made abroad or in the U.S. are marketed
in approximately 150 countries.  Because these countries are so
numerous, it is not feasible to generally characterize the
risks involved.  Such risks vary from country to country and
include such factors as tariffs, trade restrictions, changes in
currency value, economic conditions and international
relations.

INSURANCE.  The Corporation maintains coverage consistent with
industry practice for most risks that are incident to its
operations.  


ITEM 2.  PROPERTIES

Management believes that the Corporation's production
facilities are suitable for their purpose and adequate to
support its businesses.  The extent of utilization of
individual facilities varies, but generally they operate at or
near capacity.  New facilities of the Corporation are under
construction and others are being expanded.  Principal
facilities and products or groups of products made at these
facilities are listed on the following pages.  In addition, the
principal facilities of the Corporation's equity companies and
the products or groups of products made at such facilities are
included on the following pages.  Products described as
consumer, service and/or nonwoven products include tissue
products for household, commercial, institutional and
industrial uses; infant, child, feminine and incontinence care
products; industrial and commercial wipers; health care
products; and related products.


<PAGE>
PART I
(Continued)


                                                                
ITEM 2.  PROPERTIES (Continued)

Headquarters Locations
   Dallas, Texas
   Roswell, Georgia
   Neenah, Wisconsin

Administrative Center
   Knoxville, Tennessee

Production and Service Facilities

United States

Alabama
   Ashville - Wood chips
   Coosa Pines - Newsprint, groundwood printing papers, pulp,
      seedling nursery
   Goodwater - Lumber
   Nixburg - Wood chips
   Roanoke - Wood chips
   Westover - Lumber
Arizona
   Tucson - Nonwoven products
Arkansas
   Conway - Consumer products
   Maumelle - Consumer products
California
   Fullerton - Consumer products
Connecticut
   New Milford - Consumer products
Georgia
   LaGrange - Nonwoven materials and products
Massachusetts
   Lee - Tobacco industry papers, thin papers, service products
   Westfield - Aviation services
Michigan 
   Munising - Printing and base papers
Mississippi
   Corinth - Nonwoven materials, service products
New Jersey
   Montvale - Aviation services
   Spotswood - Tobacco industry papers and products
New York
   Ancram - Tobacco industry papers and products
North Carolina
   Hendersonville - Nonwoven materials and products
   Lexington - Nonwoven materials and products
Ohio
   Troy - Adhesive-coated products
Oklahoma
   Jenks - Consumer products
South Carolina
   Beech Island - Consumer and service products


<PAGE>

Tennessee
   Loudon - Service products
   Memphis - Consumer and service products
Texas
   Dallas - Aviation services
   Paris - Consumer products
   Waco - Consumer and service products
Utah
   Ogden - Consumer products
Wisconsin
   Appleton - Aviation services
   Milwaukee - Commercial airline service
   Neenah - Consumer and service products, nonwoven materials,
      business and correspondence papers
   Whiting - Business and correspondence papers

             
Outside the United States

Australia
  *Albury - Nonwoven materials and products
  *Ingleburn (near Sydney) - Consumer products
  *Lonsdale (near Adelaide) - Consumer products
  *Millicent - Consumer and service products
  *Seven Hills (near Sydney) - Consumer and service products
  *Tantanoola - Pulp
  *Warwick Farm (near Sydney) - Consumer and service products
Brazil
   Mogi das Cruzes (near Sao Paulo) - Consumer and service
      products
Canada
   Huntsville, Ontario - Consumer and service products
   Rexdale, Ontario (near Toronto) - Consumer and service
      products
   St. Catharines, Ontario - Consumer and service products,
      base papers
   St. Hyacinthe, Quebec - Consumer products
   Terrace Bay, Ontario - Pulp
   Winkler, Manitoba (mobile operations) - Flax tow
Colombia
  *Barbosa (near Medellin) - Tobacco industry papers, service
      products
  *Guarne (near Medellin) - Consumer and service products
  *Pereira - Consumer and service products, nonwoven materials
Costa Rica
   Cartago - Consumer products
El Salvador
   Sitio del Nino (near San Salvador) - Consumer and service
      products
France
   Le Mans - Tobacco industry products
   Malaucene - Tobacco industry papers
   Quimperle - Tobacco industry papers
   Rouen - Consumer products
   Villey-Saint-Etienne - Consumer products
Germany
   Koblenz - Consumer and service products

*Equity company production facility          


<PAGE>

PART I
(Continued)        


                                                                
ITEM 2.  PROPERTIES (Continued)


Honduras
   Cortes - Nonwoven products
Indonesia
  *Medan - Tobacco industry papers
Korea
   Anyang (near Seoul) - Consumer and service products
   Kimcheon (near Taegu) - Consumer and service products
   Taejon - Consumer products
Malaysia
  *Petaling Jaya (near Kuala Lumpur) - Consumer and service
      products
Mexico
  *Bajio (near San Juan del Rio) - Consumer and service
      products; business, printing and school papers
  *Cuautitlan (near Mexico City) - Consumer and service
      products
   Empalme - Nonwoven products
   Hermosillo - Nonwoven products
   Magdalena - Nonwoven products
  *Naucalpan (near Mexico City) - Consumer and service
      products; business, printing and school papers; tobacco
      industry papers; pulp
   Nogales - Nonwoven products
  *Orizaba - Consumer and service products; business, printing
      and school papers; pulp
  *Ramos Arizpe - Consumer products
   Santa Ana - Nonwoven products
Netherlands
   Veenendaal - Consumer and service products
Panama
   Panama City - Consumer and service products
Philippines
   San Pedro, Laguna (near Manila) - Consumer and service
      products, tobacco industry papers
Saudi Arabia
  *Al-Khobar - Consumer and service products
Singapore
   Singapore - Consumer and service products
South Africa
 **Cape Town - Consumer and service products
 **Germiston (near Johannesburg) - Consumer and service
      products 
 **Springs (near Johannesburg) - Consumer and service products
Thailand
   Patumthanee (near Bangkok) - Consumer and service products
United Kingdom
   Barton-upon-Humber - Consumer products
   Flint - Nonwoven materials, service products
   Larkfield (near Maidstone) - Consumer and service products
   Prudhoe (near Newcastle-upon-Tyne) - Consumer and service
      products, recycled fiber
   Sealand (near Chester) - Consumer products
Venezuela
   Guacara - Consumer products

 * Equity company production facility
** Other companies


<PAGE>

ITEM 3.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

The following is a brief description of material pending legal
proceedings to which the Corporation or any of its subsidiaries
is a party or of which any of their properties is subject:

A.   On March 11, 1993, a class action lawsuit was filed against
     the Corporation in the United States District Court, Middle
     District of Tennessee (the "Tennessee District Court"), on
     behalf of certain retirees who were formerly represented by
     the United Paperworkers International Union ("UPIU").  The
     Corporation's Motion to Transfer this action to the Eastern
     District of Wisconsin was granted.

     A similar action was filed in the United States District
     Court, Central District of California, on behalf of retirees
     who were formerly represented by the Association of Western
     Pulp and Paper Workers ("AWPPW") at the Corporation's
     Fullerton, California facility.  This second action was
     voluntarily dismissed and refiled in the Tennessee District
     Court on March 25, 1993.  The Corporation's Motion to
     Transfer this action to the Central District of California
     was granted.

     The parties to both actions have executed settlement agreements, 
     dated March 15, 1994, providing for the voluntary dismissal of 
     such actions, without prejudice, for a period of one year from 
     the date that such agreements are approved by the respective 
     courts, subject to certain conditions and circumstances 
     allowing for the earlier refiling of such actions.  On March 23, 1994,
     the court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin entered an order
     approving the settlement agreement with respect to the UPIU
     action.  The settlement agreement with respect to the AWPPW
     action has been submitted to the court for the Central
     District of California for its consideration.

     The actions relate to certain changes made by the
     Corporation to its retiree medical plans effective January
     1, 1993.  The allegations in each action are that the
     Corporation's retiree medical benefits were vested and could
     not be unilaterally amended by the Corporation, and that,
     therefore, the retirees are entitled to an unalterable level
     of medical benefits.  In the event that the AWPPW settlement 
     agreement is not approved by the court, or the 
     actions are refiled pursuant to the terms of the settlement
     agreements, management has determined that under Financial
     Accounting Standard No. 106, and based on prevailing market
     interest rates, the estimated cost to the Corporation of not
     being able to make any amendments to its retiree medical
     plans with respect to the two putative classes of retirees
     would result in a maximum pretax charge of approximately
     $5.7 million per year.

B.   Since September 28, 1990, about 60 employees of contractors
     who allegedly worked at the Corporation's mill in Coosa
     Pines, Alabama at some point in their careers filed separate
     actions in the United States District Court for the Northern
     District of Texas against the Corporation and approximately
     36 other companies.  Most of these cases were transferred to
     the Federal District Court, Northern District of Alabama and
     subsequently have been consolidated in the Federal District
     Court, Eastern District of Pennsylvania where all asbestos
     cases pending at such time in United States Federal District
     Courts were consolidated.  Approximately 4,713 individuals
     refiled three of such cases in the District Court of Orange
     County, Texas.  The actions allege, with respect to the
     Corporation, that the ownership of facilities containing
     asbestos caused the plaintiffs to suffer physical injury. 
     The actions seek unspecified damages.  The Corporation has
     denied the allegations and has asserted, among other things,
     that the claims fail to state a claim upon which relief can
     be granted and that such actions are barred by applicable
     statutes of limitation.  These actions presently are in the
     discovery phase.


<PAGE>
PART I
(Continued)

ITEM 3.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS (Continued)

C.   On September 28, 1992, the Corporation filed an action
     against Drypers Corporation, Pope & Talbot, Inc. and Pope &
     Talbot, Wis., Inc. in the United States District Court,
     Western District of Washington, alleging patent infringement
     with respect to the defendants' use of containment flaps in
     disposable diapers.  In June 1993, each of the defendants
     filed counterclaims against the Corporation alleging that
     the Corporation misused its patent in violation of the
     federal antitrust laws.  The defendants are seeking
     invalidation of the patent, treble damages based on the
     defendants' attorneys fees for defending the patent suit,
     and the defendants' attorney fees for prosecuting the
     antitrust counterclaim.  The case is currently in discovery. 
     A trial date has been set for June 7, 1994.

The Corporation also is subject to routine litigation from time
to time which individually or in the aggregate is not expected
to have a material adverse effect on the Corporation's business
or results of operations.

Environmental Matters
- ---------------------
(See the Corporation's 1993 Annual Report to Stockholders under
the "Environmental Matters" section of "Management's Discussion
and Analysis.")

The Corporation has been named a potentially responsible party
("PRP") under the provisions of the federal Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act
("CERCLA"), or analogous state statute, at 21 waste disposal
sites, none of which, in management's opinion, could have a
material adverse impact on the Corporation's business or
results of operations.  Notwithstanding its opinion, management
believes it appropriate to disclose the following recent
developments concerning three of these sites where the extent
of the Corporation's liability cannot yet be established:

A.   The South 8th Street Landfill Site, located across the
     Mississippi River from Memphis, Tennessee, in Crittenden
     County, Arkansas, is a 30-acre site that received municipal
     and industrial waste from the 1950's to the early 1980's. 
     The site is divided into three separate landfill disposal
     areas and an oily sludge pit area.  A refining company (the
     "Refiner") apparently used the pit area for the disposal of
     waste sludge from its oil re-refining process through
     November 1969.

     On September 9, 1992, the Environmental Protection Agency
     (the "EPA") identified Kimberly-Clark's Memphis mill as a
     PRP at the site.  The  mill was linked to the site by an
     affidavit of an employee of the Refiner which alleged that
     the Refiner picked up waste oil at the mill for re-refining. 
     While Kimberly-Clark did not send hazardous wastes to the
     site, it did send used oil to the Refiner for reclamation.  

     The EPA recently conducted a Remedial Investigation and
     Feasibility Study with respect to the site.  Based on such
     study, the EPA's preferred remedial alternative for the
     landfill area is organic treatment, stabilization and
     disposal in a licensed, nonhazardous landfill at a cost of
     $14.8 million to $18.1 million.  The EPA's preferred
     remedial alternative for the oily sludge pit is natural soil
     cover at a cost of $2.3 million.  There are approximately
     103 members, including Kimberly-Clark, of the PRP group with
     respect to the site.  The Corporation's estimated share of
     total site remediation cost, if any, cannot yet be
     established.

<PAGE>

B.   In August 1992, Kimberly-Clark's Spotswood, New Jersey mill
     received an information request from the New Jersey
     Department of Environmental Protection and Energy ("NJDEPE")
     with respect to the Jones Industrial Service Landfill. 
     Kimberly-Clark currently has no information about the site
     or the status of the NJDEPE's actions to date.  Kimberly-
     Clark does not have records indicating that the mill used
     the site.  However, the Spotswood mill has used an
     industrial company for nonhazardous waste disposal services
     and has received routing sheets from such company which
     indicate that the company may have sent three loads of
     Spotswood mill waste to the site in September 1980.  Until
     Kimberly-Clark receives the site information requested from
     the State of New Jersey, no determination regarding the
     extent of Kimberly-Clark's liability, if any, can be made.

C.   On February 6, 1991, the NJDEPE identified the Corporation
     as a PRP under the provisions of the New Jersey Spill
     Compensation and Control Act for remediation of the Global
     Sanitary Landfill waste disposal site located in Old Bridge
     Township, New Jersey based on the Corporation's disposal of
     waste at such site.  The EPA has designated the disposal
     site as a state-led site under CERCLA with the NJDEPE acting
     as lead agency.  In May 1991, the Corporation signed a PRP
     agreement and paid an administrative assessment.  In August
     1993, a consent decree was executed by the State of New
     Jersey and the PRPs, pursuant to which the Corporation
     agreed to pay $575,000 for its share of Phase I cleanup
     costs.  The Corporation's share of Phase II cleanup costs,
     if any, cannot yet be established.


<PAGE>
PART I
(Continued)


ITEM 4.  SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS

No matters were submitted to a vote of security holders during
the fourth quarter of 1993.

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

The names and ages of the executive officers of the Corporation
as of March 1, 1994, together with certain biographical
information are as follows:

JAMES D. BERND, 60, was elected Executive Vice President
effective December 1, 1990.  Mr. Bernd joined Kimberly-Clark in
1959 as a trainee at the Niagara Falls, New York, mills.  He
was appointed Marketing Manager for KLEENEX(R) facial tissue in
1973 and Business Manager for Household Products in 1975.  Mr.
Bernd was appointed Division Vice President in 1976, President
of the Household Products Sector in 1985 and assumed his
present position in 1990.  He is responsible for the Household
Products and Service and Industrial Sectors, U.S. Consumer
Sales, Consumer Business Services and Safety and Quality
Assurance.  Mr. Bernd is a member of the University of
Wisconsin School of Business Board of Visitors, the Riverside
Medical Center - Waupaca Board of Trustees, and the Associated
Bank, National Association Board of Directors.  He has been a
director of the Corporation since 1990.

JOHN W. DONEHOWER, 47, was elected Senior Vice President and
Chief Financial Officer in 1993.  Mr. Donehower joined
Kimberly-Clark in 1974.  He was appointed Director of Finance -
Europe in 1978, Vice President, Marketing and Sales - Nonwovens
in 1981, Vice President, Specialty Papers in 1982, Managing
Director, Kimberly-Clark Australia Pty. Limited in 1982, and
Vice President, Professional Health Care, Medical and Nonwoven
Fabrics in 1985.  He was appointed President, Specialty
Products - U.S. in 1987, and President - World Support Group in
1990.

O. GEORGE EVERBACH, 55, was appointed Senior Vice President -
Law and Government Affairs in 1988.  Mr. Everbach joined Kimberly-Clark 
in 1984.  His responsibilities within the Corporation have included 
direction of legal, human resources and administrative functions.  He 
was elected Vice President and General Counsel in 1984, Vice President, 
Secretary and General Counsel in 1985, and Senior Vice President and 
General Counsel in 1986.  

THOMAS J. FALK, 35, was elected Group President - Infant and
Child Care in 1993.  Mr. Falk joined Kimberly-Clark in 1983. 
His responsibilities within the Corporation have included
internal audit, financial and strategic analysis and operations
management.  He was appointed Vice President - Operations
Analysis and Control in 1990 and Senior Vice President -
Analysis and Administration in 1992.

JAMES G. GROSKLAUS, 58, was elected Executive Vice President
effective December 1, 1990.  He is responsible for the Pulp and
Newsprint, Paper and Specialty Products Sectors, and also is
responsible for various staff functions.  Employed by the
Corporation since 1957, Mr. Grosklaus was appointed Vice
President in 1972 and Divisional Vice President in 1975, and
was elected Senior Vice President effective January 1, 1979. 
He was appointed President, K-C Health Care, Nonwoven and
Industrial Group in 1981, Senior Staff Vice President in 1982,
Senior Vice President in 1983 and President, Technical Paper
and Specialty Products in 1985, and elected Executive Vice
President in January 1986.  In 1988, he was appointed President
- - North American Pulp and Paper Sector.  He is a member of the
Emory University Board of Visitors and the Woodruff Arts Center
Board of Trustees.  He has been a director of the Corporation
since 1987.

<PAGE>

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT (Continued)


TIMOTHY E. HOEKSEMA, 47, was appointed President -
Transportation Sector in 1988.  Mr. Hoeksema joined Kimberly-
Clark in 1969.  Prior to 1977, Mr. Hoeksema served as Chief
Pilot of Kimberly-Clark.  He was elected President of K-C
Aviation Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark, in
1977, and President of Midwest Express Airlines, Inc., a wholly
owned subsidiary of K-C Aviation Inc., in 1983.

JAMES T. MCCAULEY, 55, was elected Executive Vice President in
1990.  Mr. McCauley joined Kimberly-Clark in 1969.  He was
elected Treasurer in 1980, Vice President and Treasurer in
1980, appointed Vice President - Nonwoven Operations in 1984,
Senior Vice President, Kimberly-Clark Newsprint & Pulp and
Forest Products in 1984, President, North American Pulp and
Newsprint Sector in 1985, President, Health Care and Nonwovens
Sector in 1987, and President - Nonwovens and Technical
Products Sector in 1988.  Mr. McCauley was appointed President -
Nonwovens, Medical and Technical Products Sector in 1988 and
was appointed President - Nonwovens and Professional Health
Care Sector, Far East Operations and World Support Group in
1990. 

WAYNE R. SANDERS, 46, was elected Chief Executive Officer of
the Corporation effective December 19, 1991, and Chairman of
the Board effective March 31, 1992.  He previously had been
elected President and Chief Operating Officer in December 1990. 
Employed by the Corporation in 1975, Mr. Sanders was appointed
Vice President of Kimberly-Clark Canada Inc., a wholly owned
subsidiary of the Corporation, in 1981.  He held various
positions in that company, and was appointed Director and
President in 1984.  Mr. Sanders was elected Senior Vice
President of Kimberly-Clark Corporation in 1985 and was
appointed President - Infant Care Sector in 1987, President -
Personal Care Sector in 1988 and President - World Consumer,
Nonwovens and Service and Industrial Operations in 1990.  He is
a member of the Lawrence University Board of Trustees and the
Marquette University Board of Trustees.  He has been a director
of the Corporation since 1989.

KATHI P. SEIFERT, 44, was elected Group President - Feminine
and Adult Care effective January 7, 1994.  Ms. Seifert joined
Kimberly-Clark in 1978.  Her responsibilities in the
Corporation have included various marketing positions within
the Service and Industrial, Consumer Tissue and Feminine
Products business sectors.  She was appointed President -
Feminine Care Sector, in 1991.

JOHN A. VAN STEENBERG, 46, was elected President - European
Consumer and Service & Industrial Operations effective January
1, 1994.  Mr. Van Steenberg joined Kimberly-Clark in 1978.  His
previous responsibilities have included operations and major
project management.  He was appointed Managing Director of
Kimberly-Clark Australia Pty. Limited in 1990.



<PAGE>

PART II



ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT'S COMMON STOCK AND RELATED
STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

The dividend and market price data included in Note 11 to the
Financial Statements, and the information covered by the
captions "Dividends and Dividend Reinvestment Plan" and "Stock
Exchanges" contained in the 1993 Annual Report to Stockholders
are incorporated in this Item 5 by reference.

As of March 18, 1994, the Corporation had 25,121 stockholders
of record.


ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

(Millions of dollars                        Year Ended December 31               
                             -----------------------------------------------------
except per share amounts)      1993       1992       1991       1990       1989  
- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                          <C>        <C>        <C>        <C>        <C> 
Net Sales ................   $6,972.9   $7,091.1   $6,776.9   $6,407.3   $5,733.6
Restructuring Charge (2)..       --        250.0       --         --         -- 
Operating Profit .........      793.5      543.1      741.8      753.6      673.4
Share of Net Income of 
 Equity Companies ........       98.0       82.9       72.8       58.2       49.3
Income Before Cumulative 
 Effects of Accounting 
 Changes  ................      510.9      345.0      508.3      432.1      423.8
Net Income (1) (2) (3) (4)      510.9      135.0      508.3      432.1      423.8
Per Share Basis:
 Income Before Cumulative
  Effects of Accounting
  Changes  ...............       3.18       2.15       3.18       2.70       2.63
 Net Income (1) (2) (3) (4)      3.18        .84       3.18       2.70       2.63
 Cash Dividends Declared..       1.29       2.07       1.52       1.36       1.30
 Cash Dividends Paid  ....       1.70       1.64       1.45       1.35       1.18
Total Assets .............    6,380.7    6,029.1    5,704.8    5,283.9    4,923.0
Long-Term Debt ...........      933.1      994.6      874.7      728.5      745.1
Stockholders' Equity .....    2,457.2    2,191.1    2,519.7    2,259.7    2,085.8

<FN>
(1)    Net income for 1993 includes a charge of $15.5 million
       ($.10 per share) for the effect of the enactment of the
       1993 Tax Act.

(2)    Results for 1992 include a pretax charge of $250.0 million
       or $172.0 million after-tax ($1.07 per share) related to
       the restructuring of the consumer and service products
       operations in Europe and certain operations in North
       America.

(3)    Net income for 1992 includes net after-tax charges of
       $210.0 million ($1.31 per share) for the cumulative
       effects of adopting the required accounting rules for
       postretirement health care and life insurance benefits and
       for income taxes.

(4)    Net income for 1991 and 1990 includes a favorable
       adjustment of $20.0 million ($.13 per share) and a charge
       of $44.0 million ($.28 per share), respectively, related
       to the disposition of Spruce Falls Power and Paper
       Company, Limited, a former 50.5-percent-owned Canadian
       newsprint subsidiary.

</TABLE>


<PAGE>
PART II
(Continued)

                

ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL
CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATION

The information under the caption "Management's Discussion and
Analysis" contained in the 1993 Annual Report to Stockholders
is incorporated in this Item 7 by reference.


ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

The financial statements of the Corporation and its
subsidiaries and independent auditors' report contained in the
1993 Annual Report to Stockholders are incorporated in this
Item 8 by reference.


ITEM 9.  CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON
ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

None.



<PAGE>

PART III
            


ITEM 10.  DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

The section of the 1994 Proxy Statement captioned "Certain
Information Regarding Directors and Nominees" under "Proposal
1. Election of Directors" identifies members of the board of
directors of the Corporation and nominees, and is incorporated
in this Item 10 by reference.

See also "EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT" appearing in

Part I hereof.


ITEM 11.  EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

The information in the section of the 1994 Proxy Statement
captioned "Executive Compensation" under "Proposal 1. Election
of Directors" is incorporated in this Item 11 by reference.


ITEM 12.  SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND
MANAGEMENT

The information in the sections of the 1994 Proxy Statement
captioned "Security Ownership of Management" and "Other
Principal Holder of Voting Securities" under "Proposal 1.
Election of Directors" is incorporated in this Item 12 by
reference.


ITEM 13.  CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS

The information in the sections captioned "Certain Transactions
and Business Relationships" and "Executive Compensation --
Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation"
under "Proposal 1. Election of Directors" of the 1994 Proxy
Statement is incorporated in this Item 13 by reference.



<PAGE>

PART IV


ITEM 14.  EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES, AND REPORTS
ON FORM 8-K

(a) DOCUMENTS FILED AS PART OF THIS REPORT.

1.   Financial statements:

The Consolidated Balance Sheet as of December 31, 1993 and
1992, and the related Consolidated Income Statement and
Consolidated Cash Flow Statement for the years ended December
31, 1993, 1992 and 1991, and the related Notes thereto, and the
Independent Auditors' Report are incorporated in Part II, Item
8 of this Form 10-K by reference to the Financial Statements 
contained in the 1993 Annual Report to Stockholders.
                                             
2.   Financial statement schedules:

The following information is filed as part of this Form 10-K
and should be read in conjunction with the consolidated
financial statements in the 1993 Annual Report to Stockholders.


Independent Auditors' Report

Schedules for Kimberly-Clark Corporation and Subsidiaries:

   V  Property, Plant and Equipment                

  VI  Accumulated Depreciation of Property, Plant and Equipment

VIII  Valuation and Qualifying Accounts

  IX  Short-Term Borrowings

All other schedules have been omitted because they were not
applicable or because the required information has been
included in the financial statements or notes thereto.

3.   Exhibits:

Exhibit No.(3)a. Restated Certificate of Incorporation of
Kimberly-Clark Corporation, dated April 16, 1987, incorporated
by reference to Exhibit No. 4e. of the Kimberly-Clark Corporation 
Form S-8 filed on February 16, 1993 (File No. 33-58402).

Exhibit No.(3)b. By-Laws of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, as
amended April 22, 1993, incorporated by reference to Exhibit No.(3) of
the Kimberly-Clark Corporation Form 10-Q for the quarterly
period ended June 30, 1993.

Exhibit No.(4). Copies of instruments defining the rights of
holders of long-term debt will be furnished to the Securities
and Exchange Commission on request.


<PAGE>

PART IV
(Continued)


ITEM 14.  EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES, AND REPORTS
ON FORM 8-K
(Continued)

Exhibit No.(10)a. Kimberly-Clark Corporation 1976 Equity
Participation Plan, as amended effective May 1, 1987,
incorporated by reference from the Kimberly-Clark Corporation
Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1992.

Exhibit No.(10)b. Kimberly-Clark Corporation Management
Achievement Award Program, incorporated by reference to Exhibit
No. (10)b of the Kimberly-Clark Corporation Form 10-K for the
year ended December 31, 1990.

Exhibit No.(10)c. Kimberly-Clark Corporation Executive
Severance Plan, incorporated by reference from the Kimberly-
Clark Corporation Form 10-K for the year ended December 31,
1992.  

Exhibit No.(10)d. Second Amended and Restated Deferred
Compensation Plan for Directors of Kimberly-Clark Corporation,
incorporated by reference from the Kimberly-Clark Corporation
Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1992.

Exhibit No.(10)e. Kimberly-Clark Corporation 1986 Equity
Participation Plan, as amended effective May 1, 1987,
incorporated by reference from the Kimberly-Clark Corporation
Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1992.

Exhibit No. (10)f. Kimberly-Clark Corporation 1992 Equity
Participation Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit No.
4A. of the Kimberly-Clark Corporation Form S-8 filed on June
26, 1992 (File No. 33-49050).

Exhibit No.(11). The net income per share of common stock
computations for each of the periods included in Part II, Item
6. Selected Financial Data, of this Form 10-K are based on
average common shares outstanding during each of the respective
periods.  The only "common stock equivalents" or other poten-
tially dilutive securities or agreements (as defined in
Accounting Principles Board Opinion No. 15) in Kimberly-Clark 
Corporation's capital structure during the periods presented were 
options outstanding under the Corporation's Equity Participation Plans.

Computations of "primary" and "fully diluted" net income per
share assume the exercise of outstanding stock options under
the "treasury stock method."  The table below presents the
amounts by which the earnings per share amounts presented in

Item 6 would be reduced if the "treasury stock method" had been
used.
 
                                Primary          Fully Diluted
                                -------          -------------
            1993                 $.01                $.01
            1992                    -                   -             
            1991                  .02                 .02
            1990                  .01                 .01
            1989                  .01                 .02

Exhibit No.(12). Computation of ratio of earnings to fixed
charges for the five years ended December 31, 1993.


<PAGE>


ITEM 14.  EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES, AND REPORTS
ON FORM 8-K
(Continued)

Exhibit No.(13). Portions of the Kimberly-Clark Corporation
1993 Annual Report to Stockholders incorporated by reference in
this Form 10-K.

Exhibit No.(21). Consolidated Subsidiaries and Equity Companies
of Kimberly-Clark Corporation are identified in the 1993 Annual
Report to Stockholders, and such information is incorporated in
this Form 10-K by reference.

Exhibit No.(23). Independent Auditors' Consent

Exhibit No.(24). Powers of Attorney

(b) Reports on Form 8-K

(i)   The Corporation filed a Current Report on Form 8-K dated
      February 17, 1994, which reported the Corporation's 1993
      audited financial statements and management's discussion
      and analysis.

(ii)  The Corporation filed a Current Report on Form 8-K dated
      February 18, 1994 which reported the offering of
      $100 million principal of debt securities by the

      Corporation.


<PAGE>

SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the
Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused
this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned,
thereunto duly authorized.


                   Kimberly-Clark Corporation

March 24, 1994

                                  By:            /s/ John W. Donehower       
                                     -----------------------------------------
                                                     John W. Donehower
                                                     Senior Vice President and
                                                     Chief Financial Officer


Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of
1934, this report has been signed below by the following
persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and
on the dates indicated.


/s/ Wayne R. Sanders            Chairman of the Board          March 24, 1994
- ----------------------------
    Wayne R. Sanders            and Chief Executive Officer
                                and Director


/s/ John W. Donehower           Senior Vice President and      March 24, 1994
- ----------------------------
    John W. Donehower           Chief Financial Officer



/s/ Randy J. Vest               Vice President -               March 24, 1994
- ----------------------------
    Randy J. Vest               Controller (principal
                                accounting officer)


                                Directors
    John F. Bergstrom                            Phala A. Helm, M.D.
    James D. Bernd                               William E. LaMothe
    Pastora San Juan Cafferty                    Louis E. Levy
    Paul J. Collins                              Frank A. McPherson 
    Claudio X. Gonzalez                          H. Blair White
    James G. Grosklaus                                           


By:       /s/ O. George Everbach        
          ------------------------------------
          O. George Everbach, Attorney-in-Fact                 March 24, 1994   


<PAGE>



                                                                

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT

Kimberly-Clark Corporation:



We have audited the consolidated financial statements of
Kimberly-Clark Corporation as of December 31, 1993 and 1992,
and for each of the three years in the period ended December
31, 1993, and have issued our report thereon dated January 28,
1994, which report includes an explanatory paragraph concerning
the Corporation's changes in its methods of accounting for
income taxes and postretirement benefits other than pensions to
conform with Statements of Financial Accounting Standards No.
109 and No. 106, respectively; such consolidated financial
statements and report are included in your 1993 Annual Report
and are incorporated herein by reference.  Our audits also
included the consolidated financial statement schedules of
Kimberly-Clark Corporation, listed in Item 14.  These
consolidated financial statement schedules are the
responsibility of the Corporation's management.  Our
responsibility is to express an opinion based on our audits. 
In our opinion, such consolidated financial statement
schedules, when considered in relation to the basic
consolidated financial statements taken as a whole, present
fairly in all material respects the information set forth
therein.


/s/ Deloitte & Touche
- ---------------------

DELOITTE & TOUCHE

Dallas, Texas
January 28, 1994




<PAGE>
SCHEDULE V                       Kimberly-Clark Corporation and Subsidiaries
PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1993 AND 1992
(Millions of dollars)


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                                  Balance at                                               Balance         Annual
                                  Beginning   Additions                   Other Changes-  at End of    Depreciation
     Classification               of Period   at Cost(a)    Retirements   Add (Deduct)(b)  Period          Rates  
- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                               <C>         <C>           <C>           <C>             <C>           <C>           
December 31, 1993
 Depreciable property
  Timberlands ..................  $   50.5    $   1.8       $   .9        $    .1         $   51.5      Various
  Land improvements ............     141.9       15.0           .5           11.1            167.5       2% - 10%
  Buildings ....................     935.5       86.4          5.6          (11.8)         1,004.5       2% - 10%
  Machinery and equipment ......   4,049.5      565.9        140.6          (63.7)         4,411.1     3.5% - 20%
  Furniture and fixtures .......     261.1       44.9          8.9           (2.4)           294.7       5% - 20%
  Autos, trucks and airplanes ..     139.5       23.5         12.2            (.5)           150.3       5% - 25%
  Other depreciable property ...      17.1        9.5          2.1          (13.5)            11.0       4% - 20%
                                  --------    -------       ------        -------         --------

   Total - depreciable
    property ...................   5,595.1      747.0        170.8          (80.7)         6,090.6
                                  --------    -------       ------        -------         --------
 Nondepreciable property
  Land .........................      43.1       27.1           .1            (.6)            69.5
  Plant being constructed ......     335.9     (119.6)(c)       .2           (3.4)           212.7
                                  --------    -------       ------        -------         --------

   Total - nondepreciable 
    property ...................     379.0      (92.5)          .3           (4.0)           282.2
                                  --------    -------       ------        -------         --------

     Total .....................  $5,974.1    $ 654.5       $171.1        $ (84.7)        $6,372.8 
                                  ========    =======       ======        =======         ========

December 31, 1992
 Depreciable property
  Timberlands ..................  $   48.6    $   2.0       $   .1        $     -         $   50.5      Various
  Land improvements ............     135.1       11.6           .2           (4.6)           141.9      2% - 10%
  Buildings ....................     903.2       60.0          3.5          (24.2)           935.5      2% - 10%
  Machinery and equipment ......   3,854.7      409.8         76.0         (139.0)         4,049.5    3.5% - 20%
  Furniture and fixtures .......     242.0       32.7          9.1           (4.5)           261.1      5% - 20%
  Autos, trucks and airplanes ..     128.0       23.6         11.4            (.7)           139.5      5% - 25%
  Other depreciable property ...      14.5       14.0           .3          (11.1)            17.1      4% - 20%
                                  --------    -------       ------        -------         --------

   Total - depreciable
    property ...................   5,326.1      553.7        100.6         (184.1)         5,595.1
                                  --------    -------       ------        -------         --------
 Nondepreciable property
  Land .........................      40.4        3.6           .1            (.8)            43.1
  Plant being constructed ......     225.3      133.2(c)         -          (22.6)           335.9
                                  --------    -------       ------        -------         --------

   Total - nondepreciable 
    property ...................     265.7      136.8           .1          (23.4)           379.0
                                  --------    -------       ------        -------         --------

     Total .....................  $5,591.8    $ 690.5       $100.7        $(207.5)        $5,974.1 
                                  ========    =======       ======        =======         ========

<FN>
(a)  Amounts represent cash additions or capitalized interest on significant
     construction projects.  See Note 10 to financial statements.

(b)  Includes reclassifications, transfers and currency effects of translating property,
     plant and equipment at current rates under SFAS No. 52.  1992 includes gross
     property written down as part of the restructuring charge.  See Notes 1, 5 and 9 to
     financial statements.

(c)  Additions to plant being constructed are net of amounts reclassified to depreciable
     property captions when construction projects are completed.

</TABLE>



<PAGE>
SCHEDULE V                       Kimberly-Clark Corporation and Subsidiaries
PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1991
(Millions of dollars)


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                                  Balance at                                               Balance        Annual
                                  Beginning   Additions                 Other Changes-    at End of   Depreciation
     Classification               of Period   at Cost(a)  Retirements   Add (Deduct)(b)    Period         Rates   
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                               <C>         <C>           <C>           <C>             <C>           <C>           

December 31, 1991
 Depreciable property
  Timberlands ..................  $   45.7    $   3.0       $    -        $   (.1)        $   48.6      Various
  Land improvements ............     116.2       18.8           .3             .4            135.1       2% - 10%
  Buildings ....................     812.5       94.6          3.6            (.3)           903.2       2% - 10%
  Machinery and equipment ......   3,472.7      479.3         95.5           (1.8)         3,854.7     3.5% - 20%
  Furniture and fixtures .......     214.6       38.4         10.2            (.8)           242.0       5% - 20%
  Autos, trucks and airplanes ..     123.8        9.7          5.5              -            128.0       5% - 25%
  Other depreciable property ...      12.1        9.6          1.3           (5.9)            14.5       4% - 20%
                                  --------    -------       ------        -------         --------

   Total - depreciable
    property ...................   4,797.6      653.4        116.4           (8.5)         5,326.1
                                  --------    -------       ------        -------         --------

 Nondepreciable property
  Land .........................      37.2        2.0            -            1.2             40.4
  Plant being constructed ......     353.2     (118.4)(c)        -           (9.5)           225.3
                                  --------    -------       ------        -------         --------

   Total - nondepreciable 
    property ...................     390.4     (116.4)           -           (8.3)           265.7
                                  --------    -------       ------        -------         --------

     Total .....................  $5,188.0    $ 537.0       $116.4        $ (16.8)        $5,591.8 
                                  ========    =======       ======        =======         ========


<FN>
(a)  Amounts represent cash additions or capitalized interest on significant
     construction projects.  See Note 10 to financial statements.

(b)  Includes reclassifications, transfers and currency effects of translating property,
     plant and equipment at current rates under SFAS No. 52.  See Notes 1 and 5 to
     financial statements.

(c)  Additions to plant being constructed are net of amounts reclassified to depreciable
     property captions when construction projects are completed.

</TABLE>



<PAGE>
SCHEDULE VI                       Kimberly-Clark Corporation and Subsidiaries
ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION OF PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1993, 1992 AND 1991
(Millions of dollars)


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                                                        Additions
                                           Balance at   Charged to                                       Balance at
                                           Beginning    Costs and                        Other Changes-   End of  
        Description                        of Period     Expenses    Retirements         Add (Deduct)(a)  Period  
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                        <C>          <C>            <C>               <C>            <C>

December 31, 1993
  Timberlands .........................    $   12.4     $   .7         $    -            $  (.1)        $   13.0
  Land improvements ...................        49.1        6.0             .2               1.5             56.4
  Buildings ...........................       256.5       25.2            2.6              (2.7)           276.4
  Machinery and equipment .............     1,682.5      220.3          116.2             (23.4)         1,763.2
  Furniture and fixtures ..............       132.9       26.7            6.3               (.9)           152.4
  Autos, trucks and airplanes .........        58.9       14.2            8.9               (.4)            63.8
  Other depreciable property ..........         7.0        2.8            1.7              (3.3)             4.8
                                           --------     ------         ------            ------         --------

    Total .............................    $2,199.3     $295.9         $135.9            $(29.3)        $2,330.0
                                           ========     ======         ======            ======         ========


December 31, 1992
  Timberlands .........................    $   12.0     $   .4         $    -            $    -         $   12.4
  Land improvements ...................        44.0        5.5             .2               (.2)            49.1
  Buildings ...........................       242.0       23.8            1.9              (7.4)           256.5
  Machinery and equipment .............     1,504.5      215.6           57.9              20.3          1,682.5
  Furniture and fixtures ..............       118.8       24.6            7.7              (2.8)           132.9
  Autos, trucks and airplanes .........        54.0       13.7            8.4               (.4)            58.9
  Other depreciable property ..........         6.3        5.4             .2              (4.5)             7.0
                                           --------     ------         ------            ------         --------

    Total .............................    $1,981.6     $289.0         $ 76.3            $  5.0         $2,199.3
                                           ========     ======         ======            ======         ========


December 31, 1991
  Timberlands .........................    $   11.6     $   .4         $    -            $    -         $   12.0
  Land improvements ...................        38.8        5.4             .1               (.1)            44.0
  Buildings ...........................       223.1       22.5            2.8               (.8)           242.0
  Machinery and equipment .............     1,371.4      196.6           60.4              (3.1)         1,504.5
  Furniture and fixtures ..............       104.7       22.9            9.2                .4            118.8
  Autos, trucks and airplanes .........        45.4       13.1            4.5                 -             54.0
  Other depreciable property ..........         6.7        4.6            1.0              (4.0)             6.3
                                           --------     ------         ------            ------         --------

    Total .............................    $1,801.7     $265.5         $ 78.0            $ (7.6)        $1,981.6
                                           ========     ======         ======            ======         ========


<FN>
(a)  Includes reclassifications, transfers and currency effects of translating
     accumulated depreciation of property, plant and equipment at current rates under
     SFAS No. 52.  1992 includes reserves established as part of the restructuring
     charge.  See Notes 1, 5 and 9 to financial statements.

</TABLE>



<PAGE>
SCHEDULE VIII                     Kimberly-Clark Corporation and Subsidiaries
VALUATION AND QUALIFYING ACCOUNTS
FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1993, 1992 AND 1991
(Millions of dollars)


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                                                   Additions          Deductions  
                                            ----------------------  -------------
                                Balance at  Charged to Charged to    Write-Offs   Balance at
                                Beginning   Costs and    Other      and Discounts   End of
         Description            of Period   Expenses   Accounts(a)     Allowed      Period  
- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                             <C>          <C>           <C>       <C>            <C>

December 31, 1993
  Allowances deducted from 
    assets to which they apply

      Allowances for doubtful 
        accounts .........       $10.2        $  5.4       $.2        $  7.8(b)     $ 8.0

      Allowances for sales 
        discounts ........         7.1          97.0         -          97.3(c)       6.8
                                 -----        ------       ----       ------        -----

          Total ..........       $17.3        $102.4       $.2        $105.1        $14.8
                                 =====        ======       ====       ======        =====


December 31, 1992
  Allowances deducted from 
    assets to which they apply

      Allowances for doubtful 
        accounts .........       $ 8.2        $  4.5       $.2        $  2.7(b)     $10.2

      Allowances for sales                    
        discounts ........         5.8          96.7         -          95.4(c)       7.1
                                 -----        ------       ----       ------        -----

          Total ..........       $14.0        $101.2       $.2        $ 98.1        $17.3
                                 =====        ======       ====       ======        =====

December 31, 1991
  Allowances deducted from 
    assets to which they apply

      Allowances for doubtful 
        accounts .........       $ 7.1        $  4.8       $ -        $  3.7(b)     $ 8.2

      Allowances for sales 
        discounts ........         5.4          90.3         -          89.9(c)       5.8
                                 -----        ------       ----       ------        -----

          Total ..........       $12.5        $ 95.1       $ -        $ 93.6        $14.0
                                 =====        ======       ====       ======        =====

<FN>
(a) Primarily bad debt recoveries
(b) Primarily uncollectible receivables written off
(c) Sales discounts allowed

</TABLE>




<PAGE>
SCHEDULE IX                       Kimberly-Clark Corporation and Subsidiaries
SHORT-TERM BORROWINGS
FOR THE YEARS ENDED
DECEMBER 31, 1993, 1992 AND 1991
(Millions of dollars)


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>


                                                          Maximum
                                                          Amount      Average     Weighted
                                                        Outstanding    Daily      Average
                                               Weighted   at any       Amount     Interest
                                     Balance   Average   Month-End   Outstanding    Rate
    Category of Aggregate           at End of  Interest  During the  During the  During the
    Short-Term Borrowings            Period      Rate      Period     Period(a)  Period(b) 
- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                  <C>       <C>        <C>          <C>         <C>

December 31, 1993
  Holders of commercial paper ....   $475.4      3.2%     $475.4       $411.6        3.2%
  Other short-term debt(c) .......     79.7     10.8        96.8         91.6       12.3
                                     ------
                                     $555.1
                                     ======


December 31, 1992
  Holders of commercial paper ....   $456.7      3.5%     $456.7       $233.8        3.8%
  Less commercial paper
    refinanced(d) ................   (200.0)       -           -            -          -
  Other short-term debt(c) .......     75.8     13.4        96.0         81.5       13.1
                                     ------
                                     $332.5
                                     ======




December 31, 1991
  Holders of commercial paper ....   $125.4      4.4%     $225.8       $131.2        6.3%
  Other short-term debt(c) .......     97.7     12.8       121.1         91.8       12.2
                                     ------
                                     $223.1
                                     ======

<FN>
(a)          The average daily amount outstanding was computed by
             dividing the total of each month's average daily
             balance by 12.

(b)          The weighted average interest rates were calculated by
             dividing interest expense on short-term borrowings by
             average daily short-term borrowings.

(c)          Primarily notes payable to banks made under credit
             facilities which are renewable periodically.  Other
             amounts payable are not significant.

(d)          At December 31, 1992, $200 million of commercial paper
             was classified as long-term debt.  In February 1993,
             the Corporation issued $200 million of 7 7/8%
             Debentures due February 1, 2023 and used the proceeds
             to reduce commercial paper borrowings.

</TABLE>



<PAGE>
INDEX TO DOCUMENTS FILED AS A PART OF THIS REPORT



                                        Description
                                        -----------

Consolidated financial statements, incorporated by reference 

Independent Auditors' Report, incorporated by reference
        

Independent Auditors' Report

Schedules for Kimberly-Clark Corporation and Subsidiaries:
   V  Property, Plant and Equipment

  VI  Accumulated Depreciation of Property, Plant and Equipment

VIII  Valuation and Qualifying Accounts

  IX  Short-Term Borrowings

Exhibit No.(3)a. Restated Certificate of Incorporation of
Kimberly-Clark Corporation, dated April 16, 1987, incorporated
by reference to Exhibit No. 4e. of the Kimberly-Clark
Corporation Form S-8 filed on February 16, 1993 
(File No. 33-58402)

Exhibit No.(3)b. By-Laws of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, as
amended April 22, 1993, incorporated by reference to Exhibit
No.(3) of the Kimberly-Clark Corporation Form 10-Q for the
quarterly period ended June 30, 1993

Exhibit No.(4). Copies of instruments defining the rights of
holders of long-term debt will be furnished to the Securities
and Exchange Commission on request

Exhibit No.(10)a. Kimberly-Clark Corporation 1976 Equity
Participation Plan, as amended effective May 1, 1987,
incorporated by reference from the Kimberly-Clark Corporation
Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1992

Exhibit No.(10)b. Kimberly-Clark Corporation Management
Achievement Award Program, incorporated by reference to Exhibit
No.(10)b. of Kimberly-Clark Corporation Form 10-K for the year
ended December 31, 1990

Exhibit No.(10)c. Kimberly-Clark Corporation Executive
Severance Plan, incorporated by reference from the Kimberly-
Clark Corporation Form 10-K for the year ended December 31,
1992


<PAGE>
Index to Documents Filed as a Part of This Report
(Continued)


                                                                

                                        Description
                                        -----------


Exhibit No.(10)d. Second Amended and Restated Deferred
Compensation Plan for Directors of Kimberly-Clark Corporation,
incorporated by reference from the Kimberly-Clark Corporation
Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1992

Exhibit No.(10)e. Kimberly-Clark Corporation 1986 Equity
Participation Plan, as amended effective May 1, 1987,
incorporated by reference from the Kimberly-Clark Corporation
Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1992

Exhibit No. (10)f. Kimberly-Clark Corporation 1992 Equity
Participation Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit
No. 4A. of the Kimberly-Clark Corporation Form S-8 filed on
June 26, 1992 (File No. 33-49050)


Exhibit No.(11). Statement re: computation of earnings per
share 

Exhibit No.(12). Computation of ratio of earnings to
fixed charges 

Exhibit No.(13). Portions of the Kimberly-Clark Corporation
1993 Annual Report to Stockholders incorporated by reference in
this Form 10-K

Exhibit No.(21). Consolidated Subsidiaries and Equity Companies
of Kimberly-Clark Corporation are identified in the 1993 Annual
Report to Stockholders, and such information is incorporated in
this Form 10-K by reference

Exhibit No.(23). Independent Auditors' Consent 

Exhibit No.(24). Powers of Attorney 






                                                            Exhibit No. (12)

                        KIMBERLY-CLARK CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

                     Computation of Ratio of Earnings to Fixed Charges
                               (Dollar amounts in millions)


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                                                                                 Year Ended December 31        
                                                                        -----------------------------------------------------
                                                                          1993       1992        1991       1990       1989 
- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                                                      <C>        <C>         <C>        <C>        <C>
Consolidated Companies
- ----------------------
   Income before income taxes ....................                       $713.0     $461.9      $684.3     $660.8     $630.8
   Interest expense ..............................                        112.6       99.4       102.1       88.1       68.2
   Interest factor in rent expense ...............                         23.1       26.4        22.6       20.8       11.0
   Amortization of capitalized interest ..........                          5.7        5.7         4.7        4.1        3.4

Equity Affiliates
- -----------------
   Share of 50%-owned:
      Income before income taxes ..................                        34.6       39.3        28.2       21.3       19.8
      Interest expense ............................                         7.6        3.1         5.1        8.6        8.8
      Interest factor in rent expense .............                          .6         .6          .7         .7         .5
      Amortization of capitalized interest ........                          .6         .3          .2         .2         .1
  Distributed income of less than 50%-owned .....                          41.4       41.7        43.4       33.2       39.2
                                                                         ------     ------      ------     ------     ------ 

Earnings ........................................                        $939.2     $678.4      $891.3     $837.8     $781.8
                                                                         ======     ======      ======     ======     ====== 


Consolidated Companies
- ----------------------
   Interest expense ..............................                       $112.6     $ 99.4      $102.1     $ 88.1     $ 68.2
   Capitalized interest ..........................                         19.0       18.6        14.7       20.3       20.2
   Interest factor in rent expense ...............                         23.1       26.4        22.6       20.8       11.0

Equity Affiliates
- -----------------
   Share of 50%-owned:
      Interest expense and capitalized interest ...                         8.1        8.1         7.1        9.0        9.3
      Interest factor in rent expense .............                          .6         .6          .7         .7         .5
                                                                         ------     ------      ------     ------     ------ 

Fixed charges ...................................                        $163.4     $153.1      $147.2     $138.9     $109.2
                                                                         ======     ======      ======     ======     ====== 

        Ratio of earnings to fixed charges ........                        5.75       4.43(a)     6.06       6.03       7.16
                                                                         ======     ======      ======     ======     ====== 

<FN>
(a)   The 1992 ratio of earnings to fixed charges excluding the pretax restructuring charge of
      $250.0 million was
 6.06.

</TABLE>





                                                      EXHIBIT NO. (13)



<TABLE>                             
<CAPTION>
                             Consolidated Income Statement


(Millions of dollars                                       Year Ended December 31   
except per share amounts)                                 1993      1992      1991  
                                                        --------  --------  --------

<S>                                                     <C>       <C>       <C> 
Net Sales ...........................................   $6,972.9  $7,091.1  $6,776.9

  Cost of products sold .............................    4,581.4   4,534.5   4,332.4
                                                        --------  --------  --------

Gross Profit ........................................    2,391.5   2,556.6   2,444.5

  Advertising, promotion and selling expenses .......    1,068.3   1,255.6   1,202.5
  Research expense ..................................      158.5     156.1     148.8
  General expense ...................................      371.2     351.8     351.4
  Restructuring charge ..............................          -     250.0         -
                                                        --------  --------   --------

Operating Profit ....................................      793.5     543.1     741.8

  Interest expense ..................................     (112.6)    (99.4)   (102.1)
  Other income (expense), net .......................       32.1      18.2      44.6
                                                        --------  --------   -------

Income Before Income Taxes ..........................      713.0     461.9     684.3

  Provision for income taxes ........................      284.4     186.3     236.1
                                                        --------   -------   -------

Income Before Equity Interests ......................      428.6     275.6     448.2

  Share of net income of equity companies ...........       98.0      82.9      72.8
  Minority owners' share of subsidiaries' 
    net income ......................................      (15.7)    (13.5)    (12.7)
                                                        --------  --------   -------

Income Before Cumulative Effects of Accounting Changes     510.9     345.0     508.3

  Cumulative effects of accounting changes:
    Other postretirement benefits, net of
      income taxes ..................................          -    (245.0)        -
    Income taxes ....................................          -      35.0         -
                                                        --------  --------   -------

Net Income ..........................................   $  510.9  $  135.0  $  508.3
                                                        ========  ========  =========


Per Share Basis

  Income before cumulative effects of accounting
    changes .........................................   $   3.18  $   2.15  $   3.18

  Cumulative effects of accounting changes:
    Other postretirement benefits, net of
      income taxes ..................................          -     (1.53)        -
    Income taxes ....................................          -       .22         -
                                                        --------  --------   -------
  Net income ........................................   $   3.18  $    .84  $   3.18
                                                        ========  ========  =========
</TABLE>


See Notes to Financial
 Statements.


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                              Consolidated Balance Sheet


                                                                      December 31   
(Millions of dollars)                    Assets                     1993      1992  
- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                                               <C>       <C>
Current Assets
  Cash and cash equivalents ...................................   $   34.8  $   41.1
  Accounts receivable .........................................      738.7     775.1
  Inventories .................................................      775.9     719.7
  Deferred income tax benefits ................................       93.7      81.8
  Prepaid expenses ............................................       32.1      64.9
                                                                  --------  --------

    Total Current Assets ......................................    1,675.2   1,682.6
                                                                  --------  --------

Property
  Land and timberlands ........................................      121.0      93.6
  Buildings ...................................................    1,004.5     935.5
  Machinery and equipment .....................................    5,034.6   4,609.1
  Construction in progress ....................................      212.7     335.9
                                                                  --------  --------
                                                                   6,372.8   5,974.1

  Less accumulated depreciation ...............................    2,330.0   2,199.3
                                                                  --------  --------

    Net Property ..............................................    4,042.8   3,774.8


Investments in Equity Companies ...............................      398.3     349.7

Deferred Charges and Other Assets .............................      264.4     222.0
                                                                  --------  --------

                                                                  $6,380.7  $6,029.1
                                                                  ========  ========
</TABLE>


See Notes to Financial Statements.


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>


                                                                     December 31    
               Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity                 1993      1992  
- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------            
<S>                                                              <C>        <C>
Current Liabilities
  Debt payable within one year ...............................   $  684.8   $  445.3
  Trade accounts payable .....................................      322.0      372.9
  Other payables .............................................      116.1       99.6
  Accrued expenses ...........................................      594.6      674.8
  Accrued income taxes .......................................      121.8       95.2
  Dividends payable ..........................................       69.2      135.0
                                                                 --------   --------

    Total Current Liabilities ................................    1,908.5    1,822.8
                                                                 --------   --------

Long-Term Debt ...............................................      933.1      994.6
                                                                 --------   --------
Noncurrent Employee Benefit Obligations ......................      430.0      409.3
                                                                 --------   --------
Deferred Income Taxes ........................................      585.0      554.6
                                                                 --------   --------
Minority Owners' Interests in Subsidiaries ...................       66.9       56.7
                                                                 --------   --------
Stockholders' Equity
  Common stock-$1.25 par value-authorized 300.0 million
    shares; issued 161.9 million .............................      202.4      202.4
  Additional paid-in capital .................................       27.1       27.6
  Common stock held in treasury, at cost - 1.0 million
    and 1.1 million shares at December 31, 1993 and
    1992, respectively .......................................      (32.9)     (38.9)
  Unrealized currency translation adjustments ................     (240.6)    (197.9)
  Retained earnings ..........................................    2,501.2    2,197.9
                                                                 --------   --------
    Total Stockholders' Equity ...............................    2,457.2    2,191.1
                                                                 --------   --------
                                                                 $6,380.7   $6,029.1
                                                                 ========   ========

</TABLE>


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                           Consolidated Cash Flow Statement
                                                                              

                                                           Year Ended December 31   
(Millions of dollars)                                     1993      1992      1991  
- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                                      <C>       <C>       <C>
Operations
  Net income .........................................   $ 510.9   $ 135.0   $ 508.3
  Depreciation .......................................     295.9     289.0     265.5
  Restructuring charge ...............................         -     250.0         -
  Cumulative effects of accounting changes ...........         -     210.0         -
  Deferred income tax provision (benefit) ............      23.6      (3.4)      7.0
  Equity companies' earnings in excess of
    dividends paid ...................................     (49.0)    (35.6)    (20.9)
  Minority owners' share of subsidiaries'
    net income .......................................      15.7      13.5      12.7
  Changes in operating working capital ...............     (71.7)    (92.7)    (53.0)
  Other ..............................................      21.3     (11.8)    (14.7)
                                                         -------   -------   -------

      Cash Provided by Operations ....................     746.7     754.0     704.9
                                                         -------   -------   -------

Investing
  Capital spending ...................................    (654.5)   (690.5)   (537.0)
  Other ..............................................     (11.1)    (79.0)     (8.1)
                                                         -------   -------   -------
      Cash Used for Investing ........................    (665.6)   (769.5)   (545.1)
                                                         -------   -------   -------
Financing
  Cash dividends paid ................................    (273.4)   (262.8)   (231.9)
  Changes in debt payable within one year ............     239.5     138.7    (103.3)
  Increases in long-term debt ........................      83.9     237.4     233.0
  Decreases in long-term debt ........................    (145.4)   (117.5)    (86.8)
  Other ..............................................       8.0      18.0      11.8
                                                         -------   -------   -------
      Cash (Used for) Provided by Financing ..........     (87.4)     13.8    (177.2)
                                                         -------   -------   -------
Decrease in Cash and Cash Equivalents ................   $  (6.3)  $  (1.7)  $ (17.4)
                                                         =======   =======   =======
</TABLE>


See Notes to Financial Statements.



NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


NOTE 1.  ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Kimberly-Clark Corporation's accounting policies conform to
generally accepted accounting principles.  Significant policies
followed are described below.

Basis of Presentation
- ---------------------

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of
Kimberly-Clark Corporation and all significant subsidiaries
which are more than 50 percent owned and controlled. 
Investments in significant nonconsolidated companies which are
at least 20 percent owned are stated at cost plus equity in
undistributed net income.  These latter companies are referred
to as equity companies.

Certain reclassifications have been made to conform prior
years' data to the current year presentation.

Start-Up and Preoperating Costs
- -------------------------------

Costs of bringing certain new or expanded facilities into
operation are recorded as deferred charges and amortized to
income over periods of not more than five years.

Advertising and Promotion Expenses
- ----------------------------------

Advertising expenses are charged to income during the year in
which they are incurred.  Promotion expenses are charged to
income over the period of the promotional campaign.

Per Share Data
- --------------

Per share data are based on the average number of common shares
outstanding, which was 160.9 million, 160.4 million and
160.0 million for the years ended December 31, 1993, 1992 and
1991, respectively.

Inventories
- -----------

U.S. inventories valued at cost on the Last-In, First-Out
(LIFO) method for U.S. income tax purposes are valued in the
same manner for accounting purposes.  The balance of the U.S.
inventories and inventories of consolidated operations outside
the U.S. are valued at the lower of cost, using the First-In,
First-Out (FIFO) method, or market.

Property and Depreciation
- -------------------------

Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost.  Depreciable
property is depreciated on the straight-line or units-of-
production method for accounting purposes and generally on an
accelerated method for income tax purposes.  When property is
sold or retired, the cost of the property and the related
accumulated depreciation are removed from the balance sheet and
any gain or loss on the transaction is included in income.


NOTE 2.  INCOME TAXES

Effective January 1, 1992, the Corporation adopted Statement of
Financial Accounting Standards No. 109, "Accounting for Income
Taxes" (SFAS No. 109).  SFAS No. 109 requires that deferred
income taxes be based on the expected future tax consequences
of temporary differences between the book and tax bases of
assets and liabilities.  Previously, deferred income taxes were
determined based on the historical tax effects of timing
differences between book and taxable income.  The $35.0 million
cumulative effect of this accounting change was credited to
1992 income as a separate item in the consolidated income
statement.

An analysis of the provision for income taxes follows:


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                                                           Year Ended December 31  
(Millions of dollars)                                     1993      1992      1991 
- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                                      <C>       <C>       <C> 
Current income taxes:
  United States ......................................   $181.9    $131.0    $155.6
  State ..............................................     38.8      34.0      28.4
  Other countries ....................................     40.1      24.7      45.1
                                                         ------    ------    ------
                                                          260.8     189.7     229.1
                                                         ------    ------    ------
Deferred income taxes:
  United States ......................................     34.2      12.9      (9.9)
  State ..............................................       .6      (1.8)      6.8
  Other countries ....................................    (11.2)    (14.5)     10.1
                                                         ------    ------    ------
                                                           23.6      (3.4)      7.0
                                                         ------    ------    ------
    Total ............................................   $284.4    $186.3    $236.1
                                                         ======    ======    ======

</TABLE>



<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
Deferred income tax assets (liabilities) as of December 31,
1993 and 1992 are comprised of the following:

(Millions of dollars)                                                  1993       1992 
- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  <S>                                                                <C>        <C>
  Current deferred income tax assets (liabilities) attributable to:

    Advertising and promotion accruals ...........................   $  13.9    $  16.0
    Pension, postretirement and other employee benefits ..........      43.7       51.5
    Other accrued liabilities ....................................      31.2       36.9
    Prepaid expenses .............................................      (3.5)     (13.5)
    Other ........................................................      13.0       (1.4)
    Valuation allowances .........................................      (4.6)      (7.7)
                                                                     --------   -------

      Total current deferred income tax asset ....................   $  93.7    $  81.8
                                                                     ========   =======
  Noncurrent deferred income tax assets (liabilities) attributable to:

    Accumulated depreciation .....................................   $(754.7)   $(677.9)
    Start-up and preoperating costs ..............................     (29.7)     (27.5)
    Operating loss carryforwards .................................      92.6       46.4
    Other postretirement benefits ................................     153.7      142.8
    Other ........................................................     (20.9)     (23.2)
    Valuation allowances .........................................     (26.0)     (15.2)
                                                                     --------   -------

      Total noncurrent deferred income tax liability .............   $(585.0)   $(554.6)
                                                                     =======    =======

</TABLE>



The valuation allowances for deferred income tax assets
increased $7.7 million in 1993.

The components of the provision for deferred income taxes for
the year ended December 31, 1991 are as follows (in millions):


<TABLE>

<S>                                                                         <C>   
Depreciation ............................................................   $ 32.3
Disposition of a subsidiary .............................................    (11.5)
Other ...................................................................    (13.8)
                                                                            ------
  Provision for deferred income taxes ...................................   $  7.0
                                                                            ======

</TABLE>


A reconciliation of income tax computed at the U.S. federal
statutory tax rate to the provision for income taxes is as
follows:


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>


(Millions of dollars)                           1993           1992           1991     
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                           Amount Percent Amount Percent Amount Percent
                                           ------ ------- ------ ------- ------ -------
<S>                                        <C>     <C>    <C>     <C>    <C>     <C>
Tax at U.S. statutory rate .............   $249.6  35.0%  $157.0  34.0%  $232.7  34.0%
State income taxes, net of federal
  tax benefit ..........................     25.4   3.6     21.0   4.5     23.3   3.4
Operating losses for which no tax
  benefit was recognized ...............     10.0   1.4     10.8   2.3      3.2    .5
U.S. federal income tax rate increase ..      8.8   1.2        -     -        -     -
Disposition of a subsidiary ............        -     -        -     -    (10.3) (1.5)
Other - net ............................     (9.4) (1.3)    (2.5)  (.5)   (12.8) (1.9)
                                           ------  ----   ------  ----   ------  ---- 
  Provision for income taxes ...........   $284.4  39.9%  $186.3  40.3%  $236.1  34.5%
                                           ======  ====   ======  ====   ======  ====
</TABLE>



The increase in the 1993 U.S. corporate income tax rate to
35 percent from 34 percent required that deferred income tax
assets and liabilities be remeasured at the new rate.

At December 31, 1993, income taxes have not been provided on
$911 million of permanently invested unremitted net income of
subsidiaries operating outside the U.S. These earnings could
become subject to additional tax if they were remitted as
dividends, were lent to the Corporation or a U.S. affiliate, or
if the Corporation were to sell its stock in the subsidiaries. 
Any resulting U.S. or foreign tax liability would be largely
offset by U.S. foreign tax credits.

Income before income taxes included income of $31.2 million in
1993, a loss of $23.5 million in 1992 and income of
$110.6 million in 1991 from subsidiaries outside the U.S.

Net operating loss carryforwards of $270.7 million at
December 31, 1993 were applicable to certain subsidiaries
outside the U.S.  If not utilized against taxable income,
$92.3 million of this amount will expire through the year 2000. 
The remaining $178.4 million has no expiration date.


NOTE 3.  POSTRETIREMENT AND OTHER BENEFITS

Pension Benefits

The Corporation and its subsidiaries in North America and the
United Kingdom have defined-benefit retirement plans (the
principal plans) covering substantially all of their full-time
employees.  Retirement benefits are based on years of service
and generally on the average compensation earned in the highest
five of the last 15 years of service.  The funding policy is to
contribute assets that, at a minimum, fully fund the
accumulated benefit obligation, subject to regulatory and tax
deductibility limits.  Assets held in the pension trusts are
comprised principally of common stocks, high-grade corporate
and government bonds and various short-term investments.

Most other subsidiaries outside the U.S. have pension plans
covering substantially all full-time employees.  Obligations
under such plans are provided for by contributing to trusts,
purchasing insurance policies, or recording liabilities.

The components of net pension cost were as follows:


                                                Year Ended December 31 
(Millions of dollars)                           1993     1992     1991 
- -----------------------------------------------------------------------

Benefits earned ...........................    $ 56.2   $ 51.2   $ 44.4
Interest on projected benefit obligation ..     106.3    102.2     98.5
Amortizations and other ...................       3.2      4.2      1.3
                                                -----   ------   ------
                                                165.7    157.6    144.2

Less expected return on plan assets
  (Actual return was $152.5 million in
  1993, $66.7 million in 1992, and
  $165.0 million in 1991) .................     115.3    106.1    106.3
                                               ------   ------   ------

Net pension cost ..........................    $ 50.4   $ 51.5   $ 37.9
                                               ======   ======   ======


The assumed long-term rates of return on pension assets for
purposes of pension cost recognition for the principal plans
were as follows:

                                               1993     1992     1991 
                                               -----    -----    -----
      United States plans .................    10.0%    10.0%    11.0%
      Canadian plans ......................    10.5%    10.5%    11.5%
      United Kingdom plan .................    10.5%    11.0%    12.0%

Transition adjustments are being amortized to pension cost on
the straight-line method over 14 to 18 years.

The funded status of the principal plans is presented below:

                                                    December 31      
(Millions of dollars)                           1993           1992  
- --------------------------------------------------------------------

Actuarial present value of plan benefits:
  Accumulated benefit obligation:
    Vested .............................     $1,181.2       $1,019.7
    Nonvested ..........................         13.6            9.6
                                             --------       --------
      Total ............................     $1,194.8       $1,029.3
                                             ========       ========
  Projected benefit obligation .........     $1,428.8       $1,224.5
Plan assets at fair value ..............      1,252.0        1,098.7
                                             --------       --------
Plan assets less than projected
  benefit obligation ...................     $ (176.8)      $ (125.8)
                                             ========       ========

  Consisting of:
    Unfavorable actuarial experience ...     $ (211.2)      $ (114.1)
    Unamortized transition
      adjustments ......................         (2.2)          (1.9)
    Unamortized prior service costs ....        (14.1)         (15.2)
    Net prepaid pension asset ..........         50.7            5.4
                                             --------       --------
          Total ........................     $ (176.8)      $ (125.8)
                                             ========       ========

The assumed discount rates used to determine the projected
benefit obligation and accumulated benefit obligation for the
principal plans were as follows:
                                                    December 31     
                                                1993           1992 
                                                -----          -----
            United States plans ........        7.50%          8.50%
            Canadian plans .............        8.50%          9.25%
            United Kingdom plan ........        8.00%          9.50%

The assumed long-term rates of compensation increases used to
determine the projected benefit obligation for the principal
plans were as follows:
                                                    December 31     
                                                1993           1992 
                                                -----          -----
            United States plans ........        3.75%          4.50%
            Canadian plans .............        4.25%          4.50%
            United Kingdom plan ........        4.75%          6.50%

Postretirement Health Care and Life Insurance Benefits

Substantially all retired employees of the Corporation and its
North American subsidiaries are covered by unfunded health care
and life insurance benefit plans.  Benefits are based on years
of service and age at retirement.  The plans are principally
noncontributory for current retirees, but most future retirees
will pay a portion of the costs.  The U.S. plans place a limit
on the Corporation's cost of future annual per capita retiree
medical benefits at no more than 200 percent of the 1992 annual
per capita cost.

Effective January 1, 1992, the Corporation adopted Statement of
Financial Accounting Standards No. 106, "Employers' Accounting
for Postretirement Benefits Other Than Pensions" (SFAS No. 106)
using the immediate transition option.  Under SFAS No. 106, the
costs of retiree health care and life insurance benefits are
accrued over relevant employee service periods.  Previously,
these costs generally were charged to expense as claims were
paid.  The estimated accumulated postretirement benefit
obligation (i.e., transition obligation) of $395.0 million,
less related deferred income tax benefits of $150.0 million,
was charged to 1992 income as a cumulative effect of the
accounting change.  The net charge of $245.0 million is shown
as a separate item in the consolidated income statement.

The components of postretirement health care and life insurance
benefit costs were as follows:


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                          Year Ended
                                                                         December 31   
(Millions of dollars)                                                   1993      1992 
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    <S>                                                                <C>       <C>
    Benefits earned ................................................   $  6.3    $  6.7
    Interest on accumulated postretirement benefit
      obligation ...................................................     28.3      32.4
    Amortization ...................................................     (1.9)        -
                                                                       ------    ------
    Net costs (of which $24.9 million and $24.1 million
      were paid in 1993 and 1992, respectively) ....................   $ 32.7    $ 39.1
                                                                       ======    ======

</TABLE>


Retiree health care and life insurance benefits paid and
charged to expense were $22.7 million in 1991.

The components of the postretirement health care and life
insurance benefit obligation are presented below:


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                          December 31  
(Millions of dollars)                                                   1993      1992 
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   <S>                                                                 <C>       <C> 
    Accumulated postretirement benefit obligation:
        Retirees ...................................................   $243.2    $255.1
        Fully eligible active plan participants ....................     55.0      58.2
        Other active plan participants .............................     96.6      91.5
                                                                       ------    ------
          Total ....................................................    394.8     404.8
    Favorable actuarial experience .................................     22.6       5.2
                                                                       ------    ------
    Accrued postretirement benefit liability .......................   $417.4    $410.0
                                                                       ======    ======

</TABLE>
 

The current portion of the accrued postretirement benefit
liability was $27.7 million and $34.1 million as of
December 31, 1993 and 1992, respectively.

The December 31, 1993 accumulated postretirement benefit
obligation was determined using an assumed health care cost
trend rate of 16% in 1994, declining to zero in 2000 and
thereafter, which reflects the previously described limit on
the Corporation's cost of annual per capita retiree medical
benefits.  The December 31, 1992 accumulated postretirement
benefit obligation was determined using an assumed health care
cost trend rate of 17% in 1993, declining to zero in 2000 and
thereafter.  Assumed discount rates of 7.5% and 8.5% were used
to determine the accumulated postretirement benefit obligation
at December 31, 1993 and December 31, 1992, respectively.

A one-percentage point increase in the health care cost trend
rate would increase the accumulated postretirement benefit
obligation by $5.4 million at December 31, 1993 and expense by
$.5 million for the year then ended.

Other Benefits

Voluntary contributory investment plans are provided to
substantially all U.S. employees.  Under the plans, the
Corporation matches a portion of employee contributions.  Costs
under the plans were $18.0 million, $16.4 million and
$14.9 million in 1993, 1992 and 1991, respectively.


NOTE 4.  DEBT

The major issues of long-term debt outstanding were:


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                                                                December 31    
(Millions of dollars)                                          1993       1992 
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                                         <C>        <C> 
Kimberly-Clark Corporation
  Commercial paper refinanced in 1993 ...................   $      -   $  200.0
  7 7/8% Notes due 2023 .................................      199.7          -
  8 5/8% Notes due 2001 .................................      199.5      199.4
  9 3/4% Notes due 1995 .................................      100.3      100.6
  9 1/8% Notes due 1997 .................................      100.0      100.0
  12% Notes due 1994 ....................................      100.0      100.0
  9% Notes due 2000 .....................................       99.8       99.7
  9 1/2% Sinking Fund Debentures due 2018 ...............       73.7       82.7
  11 1/2% Sinking Fund Debentures redeemed in 1993,
    originally due 2013 .................................          -       48.5
  8.75% Notes ...........................................          -       25.0
  5% to 9.67% Pollution Control and Industrial
    Development Revenue Bonds maturing to 2023 ..........       58.2       32.7
  Other .................................................        3.1        3.2
                                                             -------    -------
                                                               934.3      991.8
Subsidiaries
  11% to 16.8% Debentures due 1995 and 1996 .............       41.5       30.2
  Bank loans in various currencies at fixed rates (8% to
    15% at December 31, 1993) maturing to 2000 ..........       34.7       44.9
  Bank loans at variable rates (4% to 5% at
    December 31, 1993) maturing to 2001 .................       21.4        8.5
  Other .................................................       30.9       32.0
                                                            --------   --------
                                                             1,062.8    1,107.4

Less current portion ....................................      129.7      112.8
                                                            --------   --------

  Total .................................................   $  933.1   $  994.6
                                                            ========   ========


</TABLE>


At December 31, 1992, $200 million of commercial paper was
classified as long-term debt.  In February 1993, the
Corporation issued $200 million of 7 7/8% Debentures due
February 1, 2023.  The proceeds were used to reduce commercial
paper borrowings.

Scheduled maturities of long-term debt are $159.6 million in
1995, $13.9 million in 1996, $109.2 million in 1997 and
$7.3 million in 1998.

At December 31, 1993, the Corporation had $500 million of
revolving credit facilities with a group of U.S. and European
banks.  These facilities, which were unused at December 31,
1993, permit borrowing at competitive interest rates and are
available for general corporate purposes, including backup for
commercial paper borrowings.  The Corporation pays commitment
fees on the unused portion but may cancel the facilities
without penalty at any time prior to their expiration.  Of
these facilities, $250 million expires on September 30, 1994
and the remainder expires on December 31, 1996.

Debt payable within one year:

                                                            December 31   
(Millions of dollars)                                     1993       1992 
                                                         ------     ------
Commercial paper .....................................   $475.4     $256.7
Current portion of long-term debt ....................    129.7      112.8
Other short-term debt ................................     79.7       75.8
                                                         ------     ------
  Total ..............................................   $684.8     $445.3
                                                         ======     ======

At December 31, 1993 and 1992, the estimated fair value of the
Corporation's long-term debt was $1,165.0 million and
$1,183.1 million compared with a carrying value of
$1,062.8 million and $1,107.4 million, respectively.  The fair
value of the Corporation's commercial paper and other short-
term debt approximated the carrying amount.  These fair values
were based on quoted market prices for the same or similar debt
or on current rates offered to the Corporation for obligations
with the same maturities.

NOTE 5.  FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSLATION

The income statements of foreign operations other than those in
hyperinflationary economies are translated into U.S. dollars at
rates of exchange in effect each month.  The balance sheets of
these operations are translated at period-end exchange rates,
and the differences from historical exchange rates are
reflected in stockholders' equity as unrealized currency
translation adjustments. 

Summary of unrealized currency translation adjustments:

(Millions of dollars)                                     1993      1992 
- --------------------------------------------------------------------------

Balance, January 1 ..................................   $(197.9)  $ (44.4)
                                                        -------   -------
Adjustments for the year:
  Australian Dollar .................................      (1.0)     (7.8)
  British Pound .....................................      (5.4)    (57.7)
  Canadian Dollar ...................................     (16.5)    (43.7)
  French Franc ......................................      (9.2)    (11.0)
  Other .............................................     (10.6)     (8.0)
  Deferred income taxes .............................         -     (25.3)
                                                        -------   -------
                                                          (42.7)   (153.5)
                                                        -------   -------

Balance, December 31 ................................   $(240.6)  $(197.9)
                                                        =======   =======


The income statements and balance sheets of operations in
hyperinflationary economies, i.e., Mexico prior to January 1,
1993, Brazil and Venezuela, are translated into U.S. dollars
using both current and historical rates of exchange.  For
balance sheet accounts translated at current exchange rates,
such as cash and accounts receivable, the differences from
historical exchange rates are reflected in income.

Effective December 31, 1992, the Mexican economy was determined
to no longer be hyperinflationary.  As a result, the Mexican
peso is considered to be the functional currency of the
Corporation's operations in Mexico.  In conjunction with this
change, $25.3 million of deferred income taxes was charged to
unrealized currency translation adjustments in 1992.

The net loss reflected in consolidated net income from the
translation of balance sheet accounts of operations in
hyperinflationary economies and from currency transactions was
$15.7 million in 1993, $9.2 million in 1992 and $6.4 million in
1991.

The Corporation and its subsidiaries periodically enter into
forward contracts which hedge foreign currency exposures
arising from transactions related to their businesses.  At
December 31, 1993, the Corporation had outstanding forward
exchange contracts, maturing at various dates in 1994, to
purchase $157 million and to sell $219 million of various
foreign currencies.


Note 6.  Equity Participation Plans

Equity Participation Plans adopted in 1976, 1986 and 1992
provide for awards of participation shares and stock options to
key employees of the Corporation and its subsidiaries.

Upon maturity, participation share awards are paid in cash
based on the increase in the book value of the Corporation's
common stock during the award period.  Participants do not
receive dividends on the participation shares, but their
accounts are credited with dividend shares payable in cash at
the maturity of the award.  Neither participation nor dividend
shares are shares of common stock.


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
Data concerning participation and dividend shares follow:

                                                       1993        1992         1991   
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                                  <C>         <C>         <C>
Outstanding - Beginning of year ..................    2,986,154   3,143,791   3,753,242

Awarded ..........................................    1,351,100           -     301,200

Dividend shares credited - net ...................      432,788     303,317     368,327

Matured ..........................................   (1,142,988)   (396,554) (1,248,178)

Forfeited ........................................      (42,700)    (64,400)    (30,800)
                                                     ----------   ---------   ---------
Outstanding - End of year ........................    3,584,354   2,986,154   3,143,791
                                                     ==========   =========   =========


</TABLE>


Stock options are granted at not less than market value, become
exercisable over three years and expire 10 years after the date
of the grant.


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
Data concerning stock options follow:

                                           1993               Number of Options        
                                        Price Range     1993        1992        1991   
- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

<S>                                    <C>            <C>         <C>         <C>
Outstanding - Beginning of year ....   $11.88-$46.25  2,451,973   3,190,498   3,163,086

Granted ............................   $58.63         1,351,100           -     301,200

Exercised* .........................   $11.88-$46.25   (208,658)   (720,685)   (260,626)

Cancelled or expired ...............   $41.38-$58.63    (17,480)    (17,840)    (13,162)
                                                      ---------   ---------   ---------

Outstanding - End of year ..........   $11.88-$58.63  3,576,935   2,451,973   3,190,498
                                                      =========   =========   =========

Exercisable ........................   $11.88-$58.63  2,107,995   1,624,073   1,759,238
                                                      =========   =========   =========

<FN>            

* Price ranges for options exercised in 1992 were $11.88 to
  $46.25 per share and in 1991 were $7.31 to $41.38 per share.

</TABLE>


At December 31, 1993, the number of additional shares of common
stock of the Corporation available for option and sale under
the 1992 Plan or for award as participation shares at such date
under the 1992 Plan was 7,322,300 shares.  The 1976 and 1986
Plans have expired and no additional grants will be made under
these Plans.  Amounts expensed for shares under the Plans were
$10.6 million, $5.1 million and $12.4 million in 1993, 1992 and
1991, respectively.


NOTE 7   COMMITMENTS

Operating Lease Commitments:

Future minimum rental payments under operating leases as of
December 31, 1993, were:

(Millions of dollars)           
- -----------------------------------------------------------------------
Year Ending December 31:
  1994 .......................................................   $ 47.8 
  1995 .......................................................     34.2
  1996 .......................................................     23.1
  1997 .......................................................     16.8
  1998 .......................................................     15.2
  Thereafter .................................................     69.8
                                                                 ------
    Total ....................................................   $206.9
                                                                 ======

Consolidated rental expense under operating leases was
$100.3 million, $118.9 million and $106.8 million in 1993, 1992
and 1991, respectively.

Other Commitments:

The Corporation has entered into long-term contracts for the
purchase of certain raw materials.  Minimum purchase
commitments, at current prices, are approximately $230 million
in 1994 and $190 million in each of the years 1995 and 1996. 
In no year are these purchase commitments expected to exceed
usage requirements.


NOTE 8.  STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

Changes in common stock issued, treasury stock, additional
paid-in capital and retained earnings are shown below:


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                                                                     Additional
(Millions of dollars       Common Stock Issued      Treasury Stock    Paid-In   Retained
except share amounts)        Shares     Amount     Shares    Amount   Capital   Earnings
- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                       <C>           <C>      <C>         <C>        <C>     <C>
Balance at December 31,
  1990 ................   161,906,544   $202.4   2,072,866   $(66.8)    $28.3   $2,130.0
Exercise of stock 
  options .............             -        -    (260,626)     8.2      (2.3)         -
Purchased for
  treasury ............             -        -      17,084      (.8)        -          -
Net income ............             -        -           -        -         -      508.3
Cash dividends
  declared ............             -        -           -        -         -     (243.2)
                          -----------   ------   ---------   -------    -----   --------
Balance at December 31,
  1991 ................   161,906,544    202.4   1,829,324    (59.4)     26.0    2,395.1
Exercise of stock 
  options .............             -        -    (720,685)    22.8       1.6          -
Purchased for
  treasury ............             -        -      39,359     (2.3)        -          -
Net income ............             -        -           -        -         -      135.0
Cash dividends
  declared ............             -        -           -        -         -     (332.2)
                          -----------   ------   ---------   -------    -----   --------
Balance at December 31,
  1992 ................   161,906,544    202.4   1,147,998    (38.9)     27.6    2,197.9
Exercise of stock
  options .............             -        -    (208,658)     6.8       (.5)         -
Purchased for
  treasury ............             -        -      16,526      (.8)        -          -
Net income ............             -        -           -        -         -      510.9
Cash dividends
  declared ............             -        -           -        -         -     (207.6)
                          -----------   ------   ---------   -------    -----   --------
Balance at December 31,
  1993 ................   161,906,544   $202.4     955,866   $(32.9)    $27.1   $2,501.2
                          ===========   ======   =========   =======    =====   ========


</TABLE>


On June 21, 1988, the board of directors declared a
distribution of one preferred share purchase right for each
outstanding share of the Corporation's common stock to
stockholders of record as of July 1, 1988.  The rights are
intended to protect the stockholders against abusive takeover
tactics.

A right will entitle its holder to purchase one two-hundredth
of a share of Series A Junior Participating Preferred Stock at
an exercise price of $100, but will not become exercisable
until 10 days after a person or group acquires, or announces a
tender offer which would result in the ownership of, 20 percent
or more of the Corporation's outstanding common shares.

Under certain circumstances, a right will entitle its holder to
acquire either shares of the Corporation's stock or shares of
an acquiring company's common stock, in either event having a
market value of twice the exercise price of the right.  At any
time after the acquisition by a person or group of 20 percent
or more, but fewer than 50 percent, of the Corporation's common
shares, the Corporation may exchange the rights, except for
rights held by the acquiring person or group, in whole or in
part, at a rate of one right for one share of the Corporation's
common stock or for one two-hundredth of a share of Series A
Junior Participating Preferred Stock.

The rights may, or after a vote of stockholders at a special
meeting shall, be redeemed at $.005 per right prior to the
acquisition by a person or group of 20 percent or more of the
common stock.  Unless redeemed earlier, the rights expire on
June 21, 1998.

The Corporation has 20 million shares of authorized preferred
stock with no par value, none of which has been issued.

At December 31, 1993, unremitted net income of equity companies
included in consolidated retained earnings was $377.2 million.


NOTE 9.  RESTRUCTURING CHARGE

In 1992, the Corporation announced a restructuring plan to
strengthen its competitive position in consumer and service
products operations in Europe and certain operations in North
America.  The plan included eliminating approximately
800 positions, principally in Europe; restructuring
manufacturing facilities at Rouen, France, and Larkfield,
England; discontinuing diaper production at mills in Fullerton,
Calif., and Memphis, Tenn.; writing off the No. 2 newsprint
machine at the Coosa Pines, Ala., mill; and integrating certain
U.S. and Canadian consumer and service products operations.

The $250.0 million pretax cost of the restructuring was charged
to 1992 operating profit.  The restructuring reduced 1992 net
income by $172.0 million, or $1.07 per share.

Events and decisions underlying the 1992 restructuring were as
follows:

- -  In Europe, the Corporation's earnings had been
   unsatisfactory due to weak economies, high marketing
   expenses incurred in entering certain markets and defending
   against intense competition, and an inability to achieve
   sales goals primarily in the tissue business.  In 1992,
   management decided to significantly reduce costs to improve
   its long-term cost structure, competitive position and
   financial performance.  The cost-cutting measures included
   reducing the work force at mills where personnel costs were
   too high in relation to competition and focusing on
   production of fewer products at each mill to simplify the
   manufacturing process.  The principal mills affected were in
   Rouen, France, and Larkfield, England.

- -  In North America, partially in response to the easing of
   border restrictions and tariffs, management decided to
   integrate certain U.S. and Canadian operations to increase
   manufacturing efficiencies and reduce overhead costs.  Due
   to changes in product design and improved rates of
   operation, certain of the Corporation's older diaper
   manufacturing equipment was no longer needed.  As a
   consequence, diaper production was discontinued at mills in
   Fullerton, Calif., and Memphis, Tenn.

- -  The No. 2 newsprint machine at the Coosa Pines, Ala., mill
   was shut down indefinitely in the first quarter of 1992 in
   response to weak newsprint markets, and severance costs were
   incurred.  During the balance of 1992, depreciation
   continued to be recorded on the machine while management
   assessed its options.  In December, management concluded
   that there was no profitable manner in which to use the
   machine in the foreseeable future, and wrote off the
   remaining book value of the machine.

- -  Approximately $162 million of the $250 million restructuring
   charge related to asset write-offs and $88 million related
   to the accrual of liabilities for severance pay and other
   cash obligations arising from the restructuring.  During
   1993, approximately $60 million was disbursed against
   $88 million of accrued liabilities established in connection
   with the 1992 restructuring.  In 1993, as expected, the
   Corporation began to realize lower ongoing operating costs
   and improved operating cash flow from the restructured
   operations.


NOTE 10. SUPPLEMENTAL DATA (Millions of dollars)



<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
Supplemental Income Statement Data

                                                       Year Ended December 31    
                                                     1993       1992        1991 
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                                 <C>        <C>         <C>
Maintenance and repairs expense .................   $362.4     $355.6      $343.3
Advertising expense .............................    164.7      149.2       153.4


</TABLE>



<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

Supplemental Balance Sheet Data

                                                                   December 31   
Summary of Accounts Receivable and Inventories                  1993        1992 
- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                                            <C>         <C>
Accounts Receivable:
  From customers ...........................................   $688.9      $720.2
  Other ....................................................     64.6        72.2
  Less allowances for doubtful accounts and 
    sales discounts ........................................    (14.8)      (17.3)
                                                               ------      ------

      Total ................................................   $738.7      $775.1
                                                               ======      ======

Inventories by Major Class:
  At the lower of cost on the First-In, First-Out 
    (FIFO) method or market:
      Raw materials ........................................   $155.1      $148.5
      Work in process ......................................    169.6       149.5
      Finished goods .......................................    439.9       423.3
      Supplies and other ...................................    121.5       127.9
                                                               ------      ------
                                                                886.1       849.2

  Excess of FIFO cost over Last-In, First-Out 
    (LIFO) cost ............................................   (110.2)     (129.5)
                                                               ------      ------

      Total ................................................   $775.9      $719.7
                                                               ======      ======

</TABLE>



Total inventories include $387.8 million and $358.3 million of
inventories valued on the LIFO method at December 31, 1993 and
1992, respectively.



                                                              December 31   
Summary of Accrued Expenses                                1993        1992 
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Accrued advertising and promotion expense ............   $139.4      $155.4
Accrued salaries and wages ...........................    169.5       122.1
Other accrued expenses ...............................    285.7       397.3
                                                         ------      ------
  Total ..............................................   $594.6      $674.8
                                                         ======      ======


Supplemental Cash Flow Statement Data

Summary of Cash Flow Effects of Changes           Year Ended December 31    
in Operating Working Capital*                  1993        1992        1991 
- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Accounts receivable .......................   $ 36.4      $(84.0)     $(68.0)
Inventories ...............................    (60.7)      (38.2)      (18.0)
Prepaid expenses ..........................     32.8       (10.0)       (9.1)
Trade accounts payable ....................    (50.9)       91.0          .9
Other payables ............................     16.5       (45.7)       31.1
Accrued expenses ..........................    (74.9)       19.5        59.5
Accrued income taxes ......................     26.6        (6.5)      (36.8)
Currency rate changes .....................      2.5       (18.8)      (12.6)
                                              -------     -------     -------

Changes in operating working capital ......   $(71.7)     $(92.7)     $(53.0)
                                              ======      ======      ======


* Excludes the effects of the 1992 restructuring charge and the
dispositions of certain businesses in 1993 and 1991.

                                                  Year Ended December 31    
Other Cash Flow Data                           1993        1992        1991 
- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Interest paid .............................   $126.1      $120.7      $116.1
Interest capitalized ......................     19.0        18.6        14.7
Income taxes paid .........................    231.4       208.6       275.7
Decrease in cash and cash equivalents
  due to exchange rate changes ............     (3.1)       (2.4)       (1.5)

Reconciliation of Changes in Cash and
  Cash Equivalents:
    Balance, January 1 ....................   $ 41.1      $ 42.8      $ 60.2
    Decrease ..............................     (6.3)       (1.7)      (17.4)
                                              ------      ------      ------
    Balance, December 31 ..................   $ 34.8      $ 41.1      $ 42.8
                                              ======      ======      ======


NOTE 11.  UNAUDITED QUARTERLY DATA


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

(Millions of
dollars except
per share                       1993                                 1992               
amounts)         Fourth   Third(a) Second   First     Fourth(b)  Third   Second  First(c)
- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

<S>             <C>      <C>      <C>      <C>       <C>      <C>      <C>      <C>   
Net sales ..... $1,764.0 $1,781.0 $1,725.9 $1,702.0  $1,809.3 $1,793.5 $1,748.6 $1,739.7

Gross profit       596.8    587.9    604.1    602.7     636.2    642.2    636.2    642.0
Operating
  profit (loss)    216.3    189.6    191.6    196.0     (71.9)   207.5    200.9    206.6
Income (loss)
  before
  cumulative
  effects of
  accounting
  changes .....    141.6    111.2    133.3    124.8     (55.8)   134.8    133.9    132.1
    Per Share .      .88      .69      .83      .78      (.35)     .84      .84      .82
  Net income
    (loss) ....    141.6    111.2    133.3    124.8     (55.8)   134.8    133.9    (77.9)
    Per Share .      .88      .69      .83      .78      (.35)     .84      .84     (.49)

Per share basis:
  Cash dividends:
    Declared ..      .43      .43      .43        -       .84      .41      .41      .41
    Paid ......      .43      .43      .43      .41       .41      .41      .41      .41
  Market price:
    High ......    53.75    50.63    55.38    62.00     63.25    59.50    58.63    54.00
    Low .......    48.38    44.63    45.63    53.63     50.00    53.00    48.75    46.25
    Close .....    51.88    49.00    49.50    54.75     59.00    53.88    58.50    53.13


<FN>

(a) Results for the third quarter 1993 include additional income
    tax expense of $13.5 million ($.08 per share) related to the
    increase in the U.S. statutory income tax rate to 35 percent
    from 34 percent as a result of legislation enacted in the
    third quarter effective as of January 1, 1993.

(b) Results for the fourth quarter 1992 include a restructuring
    charge of $250.0 million pretax and $172.0 million after-tax,
    or $1.07 per share, as described in Note 9.

(c) In 1992, the Corporation changed its method of accounting for
    postretirement health care and life insurance benefits and
    for income taxes.  See Notes 2 and 3.

</TABLE>



NOTE 12.  PRODUCT CLASS AND GEOGRAPHIC DATA

For reporting purposes, the Corporation's products and services
are segmented into three classes.  Class I includes tissue
products for household, commercial, institutional and
industrial uses; infant, child, feminine and incontinence care
products; industrial and commercial wipers; health care
products; and related products.  Class II includes newsprint,
printing papers, premium business and correspondence papers,
tobacco industry papers and products, technical papers, and
related products.  Class III includes aircraft services,
commercial air transportation and other products and services.

Information concerning consolidated operations by product class
and geographic area, as well as data for equity companies, is
presented in the tables below and on the following pages:


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

Consolidated Operations by Product Class

                                          Net Sales                Operating Profit  
                                  --------------------------    ----------------------
(Millions of dollars)               1993     1992     1991       1993    1992(a) 1991 
- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                               <C>      <C>      <C>         <C>     <C>     <C>
Class I .......................   $5,565.5 $5,781.5 $5,507.2    $624.6  $434.7  $581.3
Class II ......................    1,071.7  1,061.4  1,035.7     171.2   121.1   171.4
Class III .....................      383.0    298.9    280.4      26.2     6.4    16.0
                                  -------- -------- --------    ------  ------  ------

Combined ......................    7,020.2  7,141.8  6,823.3     822.0   562.2   768.7
Interclass sales ..............      (47.3)   (50.7)   (46.4)        -       -       -
Unallocated items-net .........          -        -        -     (28.5)  (19.1)  (26.9)
                                  -------- -------- --------    ------  ------  ------

Consolidated ..................   $6,972.9 $7,091.1 $6,776.9    $793.5  $543.1  $741.8
                                  ======== ======== ========    ======  ======  ======

</TABLE>



<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                              Assets              Depreciation        Capital Spending
(Millions of        ------------------------  -------------------   --------------------
dollars)            1993     1992     1991     1993   1992   1991    1993   1992   1991 
- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>               <C>      <C>      <C>       <C>    <C>    <C>     <C>    <C>    <C>
Class I .......   $4,920.5 $4,667.8 $4,440.0  $242.1 $233.7 $213.8  $548.5 $600.9 $455.1
Class II ......      802.4    759.2    752.6    35.8   35.6   33.3    86.5   64.3   62.2
Class III .....      196.3    232.5    173.2     9.9   10.6    9.1     9.8    9.0   10.0
                  -------- -------- --------  ------ ------ ------  ------ ------ ------

Combined ......    5,919.2  5,659.5  5,365.8   287.8  279.9  256.2   644.8  674.2  527.3
Unallocated(b).      616.7    608.5    550.0     8.1    9.1    9.3     9.7   16.3    9.7
Interclass 
  assets ......     (155.2)  (238.9)  (211.0)      -      -      -       -      -      -
                  -------- -------- --------  ------ ------ ------  ------ ------ ------
Consolidated ..   $6,380.7 $6,029.1 $5,704.8  $295.9 $289.0 $265.5  $654.5 $690.5 $537.0
                  ======== ======== ========  ====== ====== ======  ====== ====== ======

<FN>

(a) Operating profit in 1992 for Class I, II, III and Unallocated
    includes $216.2 million, $21.5 million, $8.2 million and
    $4.1 million, respectively, of the restructuring charge
    described in Note 9.

(b) Assets include investments in equity companies of
    $398.3 million, $349.7 million and $339.6 million in 1993,
    1992 and 1991, respectively.

</TABLE>




<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

Consolidated Operations by Geographic Area

                                          Net Sales                 Operating Profit   
                                 -----------------------------   ---------------------
(Millions of dollars)             1993       1992       1991      1993    1992(a) 1991 
- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                             <C>        <C>        <C>        <C>     <C>     <C>
United States ...............   $5,282.5   $5,297.2   $5,040.7   $780.0  $571.4  $654.5
Canada ......................      568.7      587.3      624.1    (28.8)  (17.1)   (4.4)
Intergeographic items(b)......    (243.6)    (236.1)    (220.8)       -       -       -
                                --------   --------   --------   ------  ------  ------

North America ...............    5,607.6    5,648.4    5,444.0    751.2   554.3   650.1
Europe ......................      917.0    1,016.9      959.1       .9   (56.9)   65.8
Asia and Latin America ......      501.0      443.5      389.5     69.9    64.8    52.8
                                --------   --------   --------   ------  ------  ------

Combined ....................    7,025.6    7,108.8    6,792.6    822.0   562.2   768.7
Intergeographic items .......      (52.7)     (17.7)     (15.7)       -       -       -
Unallocated items-net .......          -          -          -    (28.5)  (19.1)  (26.9)
                                --------   --------   --------   ------  ------  ------

Consolidated ................   $6,972.9   $7,091.1   $6,776.9   $793.5  $543.1  $741.8
                                ========   ========   ========   ======  ======  ======

</TABLE>


                                            Assets            
(Millions of dollars)             1993       1992       1991  
- --------------------------------------------------------------

United States ...............   $3,720.8   $3,626.4   $3,368.3
Canada ......................      487.8      499.4      547.0
Intergeographic items .......      (35.6)     (34.7)     (30.1)
                                --------   --------   --------

North America ...............    4,173.0    4,091.1    3,885.2
Europe ......................    1,085.2      965.5      980.3
Asia and Latin America ......      630.2      594.4      529.4
                                --------   --------   --------

Combined ....................    5,888.4    5,651.0    5,394.9
Intergeographic items .......     (124.4)    (230.4)    (240.1)
Unallocated items-net(c).....      616.7      608.5      550.0
                                --------   --------   --------

Consolidated ................   $6,380.7   $6,029.1   $5,704.8
                                ========   ========   ========

(a) Operating profit in 1992 for the U.S., Canada, Europe, Asia
    and Unallocated includes $148.9 million, $13.9 million,
    $81.8 million, $1.3 million and $4.1 million, respectively,
    of the restructuring charge described in Note 9.

(b) Net sales include $162.3 million, $185.8 million and
    $169.9 million by operations in Canada to the U.S. in 1993,
    1992 and 1991, respectively.

(c) Assets include investments in equity companies of
    $398.3 million, $349.7 million and $339.6 million in 1993,
    1992 and 1991, respectively.


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                              Kimberly-Clark's Share
                                      Income Before              of Income Before
                                     Equity Interests            Equity Interests    
                                  -----------------------    -----------------------
(Millions of dollars)             1993     1992(a)  1991      1993     1992(a)  1991 
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                              <C>      <C>      <C>       <C>      <C>      <C>
United States ................   $432.9   $310.8   $366.3    $432.9   $310.8   $366.3
Canada(b) ....................    (17.9)    (9.6)    15.6     (17.9)    (9.6)    15.6
                                 ------   ------   ------    ------   ------   ------

North America ................    415.0    301.2    381.9     415.0    301.2    381.9
Europe .......................    (19.6)   (61.8)    33.0     (24.5)   (66.5)    28.6
Asia and Latin America .......     33.2     36.2     33.3      22.4     27.4     25.0
                                 ------   ------   ------    ------   ------   ------

Consolidated Companies .......   $428.6   $275.6   $448.2    $412.9   $262.1   $435.5
                                 ======   ======   ======    ======   ======   ======

<FN>

(a) Income in 1992 for the U.S., Canada, Europe and Asia includes
    $98.9 million, $8.6 million, $63.7 million and $.8 million,
    respectively, of the restructuring charge described in
    Note 9.

(b) Income for 1991 includes a favorable adjustment of
    $20.0 million related to the disposition of a subsidiary.

</TABLE>


Intercompany sales of products between classes or geographic
areas are made at market prices and are referred to as
interclass sales or intergeographic items.

Assets reported by product class or geographic area represent
assets which are directly used and an allocated portion of
jointly used assets.  These assets include receivables from
other product classes or geographic areas, and are referred to
as interclass assets or intergeographic items.  Expense and
asset amounts not associated with classes or geographic areas
are referred to as unallocated items - net.


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

Equity Companies' Data by Geographic Area

                                                                             Kimberly-
                                                                              Clark's
                                                                               Share
                                   Net        Gross    Operating       Net     of Net
(Millions of dollars)             Sales      Profit      Profit      Income(a) Income 
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                             <C>          <C>         <C>         <C>         <C>
December 31, 1993
  Latin America .............   $1,120.9     $464.0      $294.7      $196.2      $86.4
  Asia, Middle East and
    Australia ...............      385.9      127.4        38.2        24.7       11.6
                                --------     ------      ------      ------      -----

    Total ...................   $1,506.8     $591.4      $332.9      $220.9      $98.0
                                ========     ======      ======      ======      =====

December 31, 1992
  Latin America .............   $  953.2     $374.1      $221.8      $150.9      $68.5
  Asia, Middle East and      
    Australia ...............      377.6      142.2        50.7        31.3       14.4
                                --------     ------      ------      ------      -----

    Total ...................   $1,330.8     $516.3      $272.5      $182.2      $82.9
                                ========     ======      ======      ======      =====

December 31, 1991
  Latin America .............   $  861.4     $342.6      $215.0      $144.0      $63.1
  Asia and Australia ........      350.2      117.7        40.9        19.5        9.7
                                --------     ------      ------      ------      -----

    Total ...................   $1,211.6     $460.3      $255.9      $163.5      $72.8
                                ========     ======      ======      ======      =====


<FN>


(a) The 1993 net income in Australia includes a $7.8 million
    credit from a decrease in the statutory income tax rate to
    33 percent from 39 percent effective January 1, 1993.  The
    1992 net income in Mexico and Australia includes a
    $4.5 million charge and $1.6 million credit, respectively,
    from the cumulative effect of adopting SFAS No. 109,
    "Accounting for Income Taxes."  Kimberly-Clark's share of
    these items is included in the cumulative effects of
    accounting changes on the consolidated income statement.

</TABLE>



<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                             Non-                     Non-     Stock-
                                Current    Current     Current      Current   holders'
(Millions of dollars)            Assets     Assets   Liabilities  Liabilities  Equity 
- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

<S>                               <C>      <C>          <C>          <C>        <C>
December 31, 1993
  Latin America .............     $551.3   $  678.3      $245.2      $311.2     $673.2
  Asia, Middle East and
    Australia ...............       98.8      342.3        85.0       148.4      207.7
                                  ------   --------      ------      ------     ------

    Total ...................     $650.1   $1,020.6      $330.2      $459.6     $880.9
                                  ======   ========      ======      ======     ======

December 31, 1992
  Latin America .............     $491.4   $  556.0      $226.4      $233.3     $587.7
  Asia, Middle East and
    Australia ...............       94.8      325.5        76.4       162.6      181.3
                                  ------   --------      ------      ------     ------

    Total ...................     $586.2   $  881.5      $302.8      $395.9     $769.0
                                  ======   ========      ======      ======     ======

December 31, 1991
  Latin America .............     $361.2   $  436.7      $176.8      $ 13.0     $608.1
  Asia and Australia ........       65.5      283.3        57.0       140.4      151.4
                                  ------   --------      ------      ------     ------

    Total ...................     $426.7   $  720.0      $233.8      $153.4     $759.5
                                  ======   ========      ======      ======     ======

</TABLE>


Equity companies are principally engaged in Class I operations. 
A listing of the Corporation's percentage ownership of the
common stock of each significant subsidiary and equity company
is contained elsewhere in this annual report.  Kimberly-Clark
de Mexico, S.A. de C.V. is partially owned by the public and
its stock is publicly traded in Mexico.  At December 31, 1993,
the Corporation's investment in this equity company is
$264.0 million, and the estimated fair value is $1.6 billion
based on quoted market prices for publicly traded shares.



Independent Auditors' Report

Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Its Directors and Stockholders:

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of
Kimberly-Clark Corporation and Subsidiaries as of December 31,
1993 and 1992 and the related consolidated income and cash flow
statements for each of the three years in the
period ended December 31, 1993.  These financial statements are
the responsibility of the Corporation's management.  Our
responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial
statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with generally accepted
auditing standards.  Those standards require that we plan and
perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether
the financial statements are free of material misstatement.
An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence
supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial
statements.  An audit also includes assessing the accounting
principles used and significant estimates made by management,
as well as evaluating the overall financial statement
presentation.  We believe that our audits provide a reasonable
basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, such consolidated financial statements of
Kimberly-Clark Corporation and Subsidiaries present fairly, in
all material respects, the financial position of the companies
at December 31, 1993 and 1992, and the results of their
operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in
the period ended December 31, 1993, in conformity with
generally accepted accounting principles.

As discussed in Notes 2 and 3 to the consolidated financial
statements, in 1992 the Corporation changed its methods of
accounting for Income Taxes and Postretirement Health Care and
Life Insurance Benefits to conform with Statements of Financial
Accounting Standards No. 109 and 106, respectively.





Deloitte & Touche 
Dallas, Texas                                   January 28, 1994




M
ANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS



Management believes that the following commentary and tables
appropriately discuss and analyze the comparative results of
operations and the financial condition of the Corporation for
the periods covered.

1992 Restructuring and Accounting Changes

The comparability of income statement data is affected by the
following items that occurred in 1992:
   
- -   The Corporation announced a restructuring plan to
    strengthen its competitive position in consumer and
    service products operations in Europe and certain
    operations in North America.  The plan included
    eliminating approximately 800 positions, principally in
    Europe; restructuring manufacturing facilities at
    Rouen, France, and Larkfield, England; discontinuing
    diaper production at mills in Fullerton, Calif., and
    Memphis, Tenn.; writing off the No. 2 newsprint machine
    at the Coosa Pines, Ala., mill; and integrating certain
    U.S. and Canadian consumer and service products
    operations.  Additional information concerning events
    and decisions which gave rise to the restructuring plan
    is presented in Note 9 to the Financial Statements.

    The $250.0 million pretax cost of the restructuring was
    charged to 1992 operating profit.  The restructuring charge
    decreased 1992 product class and geographic operating
    profit as follows: 


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

         ($ Millions)
                                     North           Outside
         Restructuring Charge       America       North America      Total 
        --------------------------------------------------------------------
         <S>                       <C>               <C>            <C>
         Class I ...............   $(133.1)          $(83.1)        $(216.2) 
         Class II ..............     (21.5)               -           (21.5)
         Class III .............      (8.2)               -            (8.2)
                                   -------           ------         -------
                                   $(162.8)          $(83.1)         (245.9) 
                                   =======           ====== 
         Unallocated ...........                                       (4.1)
                                                                    -------

         Total .................                                    $(250.0)
                                                                    =======
</TABLE>


    The restructuring reduced 1992 net income by $172.0
    million, or $1.07 per share.   

    For the purposes of this Management's Discussion and
    Analysis, the 1992 restructuring charge has been segregated
    in the product class and geographic presentations to
    facilitate a meaningful discussion of ongoing operations. 
    For a summary of the product class and geographic data
    including the restructuring charge, see Note 12 to the
    Financial Statements.

- -   New required accounting rules were adopted for
    postretirement health care and life insurance benefits
    and for income taxes.  These rules resulted in a one-
    time "catch-up" charge of $210.0 million, or $1.31 per
    share, against 1992 net income.  These changes had no
    effect on cash flow.  See Notes 2 and 3 to the
    Financial Statements.



<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

Analysis of Consolidated Operating Results

By Product Class

($ Millions)                                                                             

                                                         % Change    % of 1993
Net Sales                            1993        1992    vs. 1992  Consolidated
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                <C>         <C>        <C>       <C> 
Class I ........................   $5,565.5    $5,781.5   - 3.7%      79.8%
Class II .......................    1,071.7     1,061.4   + 1.0       15.4
Class III ......................      383.0       298.9   +28.1        5.5
Adjustments ....................      (47.3)      (50.7)               (.7)
                                   --------    --------              -----
Consolidated ...................   $6,972.9    $7,091.1   - 1.7%     100.0%
                                   ========    ========              =====

</TABLE>



<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                                                         % Change   % Return on Sales 
Operating Profit                     1993        1992    vs. 1992     1993     1992  
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                <C>         <C>        <C>       <C>       <C> 
Class I ........................   $  624.6    $  650.9   - 4.0%      11.2%    11.3%
Class II .......................      171.2       142.6   +20.1       16.0     13.4
Class III ......................       26.2        14.6   +79.5        6.8      4.9
Restructuring Charge ...........          -      (250.0)

Adjustments ....................      (28.5)      (15.0)
                                   --------    --------
Consolidated ...................   $  793.5    $  543.1   +46.1%      11.4%     7.7%
                                   ========    ========

</TABLE>


Product Classes referred to in this Management's Discussion and
Analysis are:

    -   Class I includes tissue products for household,
        commercial, institutional and industrial uses; infant,
        child, feminine and incontinence care products;
        industrial and commercial wipers; health care products;
        and related products.

    -   Class II includes newsprint, printing papers, premium
        business and correspondence papers, tobacco industry
        papers and products, technical papers, and related
        products.

    -   Class III includes aircraft services, commercial air
        transportation and other products and services.         
                                                                
                               
Commentary:

Sales volumes increased 2.6 percent compared with 1992, but net
sales declined because of lower selling prices and changes in
currency exchange rates.
 
    -   The Corporation reduced selling prices for its Huggies
        disposable diapers in the U.S. in October 1992 and
        again in June 1993 to match diaper price reductions
        announced by a major competitor.  These price
        reductions were partially offset by U.S. price and
        count changes in January 1993 and Canadian price
        increases in February 1993. 

    -   Although sales volumes for Huggies disposable diapers
        were flat in North America, this product continues to
        be the number one selling brand in the U.S.  

    -   Selling prices were lower for feminine care products
        and facial tissue in the U.S., as well as tobacco
        industry papers and products, principally in response
        to competitive business conditions. 

    -   Sales volumes for Huggies Pull-Ups training pants
        increased due to the launch of the product in Canada,
        the United Kingdom, parts of Continental Europe, Korea
        and various other countries and territories.  During
        1993, private-label and economy-branded competitors
        continued to expand distribution of their disposable
        training pants nationally in competition with the
        Corporation's training pants business, and, in the
        fourth quarter, a major competitor initiated regional
        introductions of a branded training pant.    

    -   Sales volumes increased for Depend and Poise
        incontinence care products and Huggies baby wipes in
        North America, consumer products in Asia and Latin
        America, Neenah Paper's premium business and
        correspondence papers, and Midwest Express Airlines,
        Inc.  Sales volumes were lower for household tissue
        products in North America.

    -   Although selling prices for newsprint improved, pricing
        remains at depressed levels due to overcapacity and
        weak demand in the industry.

    -   Currency translation, primarily in Europe and Canada,
        is estimated to have reduced consolidated sales by $147
        million.

Gross profit declined in absolute terms, 6.5 percent, and as a
percentage of sales.   

    -   Selling prices were lower as previously discussed. 

    -   Product improvement costs were higher, primarily for
        the new Huggies UltraTrim diapers.

    -   Increased start-up costs were attributable to a new
        European facility to support the introduction of
        Huggies Pull-Ups training pants and the upcoming launch
        of disposable diapers in the United Kingdom and parts
        of Continental Europe, and to a new feminine care
        products facility in the U.S.

    -   Industry overcapacity and weak prices in markets for
        consumer and industrial bathroom tissue contributed to
        continuing poor results for these businesses in North
        America and Continental Europe.

    -   Raw material costs were lower.

Excluding the 1992 restructuring charge, consolidated operating
profit was $793.1 million in 1992 compared with $793.5 million
in 1993.  On this basis, operating profit was virtually
unchanged but improved slightly as a percentage of sales.

    -   In connection with the lower selling prices, promotion
        expenses in North America were reduced for disposable
        diapers, feminine care products and facial tissue,
        which more than offset the decline in gross profit.

    -   Higher product introduction costs for expansion of
        Huggies Pull-Ups training pants, as well as continued
        heavy investment to support the upcoming launch of
        diapers in Europe, reduced operating profit outside
        North America.

    -   General expense in 1993 included a $6.5 million charge
        related to the settlement of a class action lawsuit
        brought by a group of property and business owners near
        the Coosa Pines, Ala., pulp and newsprint mill.

    -   General expense in 1992 was reduced by the recovery of
        legal fees related to the settlement of diaper
        litigation.

    -   Currency translation is estimated to have reduced
        consolidated operating profit by $6 million.

<PAGE>
By Geography



<TABLE>
<CAPTION>


($ Millions)                                                                              


                                                       % Change       % of 1993
Net Sales                         1993        1992     vs. 1992     Consolidated
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                             <C>         <C>        <C>            <C>
North America ...............   $5,607.6    $5,648.4   -   .7%          80.4%
Outside North America .......    1,418.0     1,460.4   -  2.9           20.3
Adjustments .................      (52.7)      (17.7)                    (.7)
                                --------    --------                   -----

Consolidated ................   $6,972.9    $7,091.1   -  1.7%         100.0%
                                ========    ========                   =====

</TABLE>



<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

                                                       % Change      % Return on Sales  
Operating Profit                  1993        1992     vs. 1992         1993     1992  
- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                             <C>         <C>        <C>             <C>      <C>
North America ...............   $  751.2    $  717.1   +  4.8%          13.4%    12.7%
Outside North America .......       70.8        91.0   - 22.2            5.0      6.2 
Restructuring Charge ........          -      (250.0) 
Adjustments .................      (28.5)      (15.0) 
                                --------    --------

Consolidated ................   $  793.5    $  543.1   + 46.1%          11.4%     7.7%
                                ========    ========

</TABLE>



<TABLE>
<CAPTION>


                                                       % Change       
Net Income                        1993        1992     vs. 1992
- ---------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                             <C>         <C>        <C>
North America ...............   $  415.0    $  408.7   +  1.5%         
Outside North America .......       95.9       108.3   - 11.4          
Restructuring Charge ........          -      (172.0)
Cumulative Effects of                 
 Accounting Changes .........          -      (210.0)
                                --------    --------

Net Income ..................   $  510.9    $  135.0   +278.4%        
                                ========    ========
</TABLE>


Additional Commentary:

    -   Excluding the previously mentioned 1992 restructuring
        charge and the cumulative effects of accounting
        changes, 1993 consolidated net income declined 1.2
        percent. 

    -   Interest expense was higher in 1993 because of higher
        debt levels primarily related to capital spending
        programs and working capital needs.

    -   Other income in 1993 included a $9.4 million pretax
        gain from the sale of forestland in Alabama.

    -   Net income was adversely affected by the enactment of
        the 1993 Tax Act, which increased the U.S. federal
        income tax rate to 35 percent from 34 percent.  This
        tax change reduced net income by $15.5 million or $.10
        per share.  Five cents related to 1993 and five cents
        related to deferred taxes for prior years.  The
        effective income tax rate declined to 39.9 percent in
        1993 from 40.3 percent in 1992.  Significant factors
        affecting the comparison were lower operating losses in
        certain non-U.S. operations for which no income tax
        benefits were recognized in 1993, a lower 1993
        effective state income tax rate and lower effective tax
        rates associated with certain other non-U.S. operations
        in 1993, partially offset by the U.S. tax rate
        increase.

    -   The Corporation's share of net income from equity
        companies grew 18.2 percent, primarily from results of
        operations in Mexico and Colombia, on the strength of
        higher sales volumes and improved selling prices. 
        Earnings from Australia declined due to higher start-up
        costs and interest expense in 1993, tempered by a lower
        income tax rate.  An insurance settlement in Australia
        also benefited 1992 results. 

    -   The sale of the assets of the Corporation's Karolton
        Envelope business was completed in December 1993.
        Neither the sale transaction, nor the operating results
        of Karolton, were material to the consolidated
        financial statements.

Adjustments:

    -   Adjustments to sales shown in the preceding tables
        consist of intercompany sales of products between
        product classes or geographic areas.  Adjustments to
        operating profit consist of expenses not associated
        with product classes or geographic areas.


LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES


<TABLE>
                                                                           Year Ended
                                                                           December 31    
($ Millions)                                                              1993      1992 
- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                                                      <C>       <C>

Cash provided by operations ...........................................  $746.7    $754.0
Capital spending ......................................................   654.5     690.5
Ratio of total debt to capital 
  (target range: 28 to 32 percent) ....................................    39.1%     39.0%
Pretax interest coverage - times ......................................     6.6       5.2
                                                                                         
</TABLE>


Commentary:

    -   The Corporation's working capital decreased $93.1
        million from December 31, 1992 to December 31, 1993. 
        Major factors affecting the decline were:

        --  a reduction in accounts receivable of $36.4 million
            related, in part, to lower net sales, 

        --  an increase in inventories of $56.2 million
            principally to support the introduction of Huggies
            diapers and training pants in Europe and Huggies
            Supreme diapers in the U.S., 

        --  a decrease in dividends payable of $65.8 million
            due to the timing of dividend declarations, 

        --  an increase in debt payable within one year of
            $239.5 million primarily related to capital
            spending programs and working capital needs, and 

        --  lower accrued liabilities related to the 1992
            restructuring, as discussed in Note 9 to the
            Financial Statements.

    -   In 1993, four cash dividends were paid aggregating
        $273.4 million, or $1.70 per share.  In 1992, four cash
        dividends were paid aggregating $262.8 million, or
        $1.64 per share.  

    -   The ratio of total debt to capital remains outside the
        Corporation's target range, in part as a consequence of
        the 1992 restructuring charge and the cumulative
        effects of the changes in accounting principles. 
        Capital is the sum of total debt, minority owners'
        interests in subsidiaries and stockholders' equity.

    -   A shelf registration for $100 million of debt
        securities is on file with the Securities and Exchange
        Commission.  The filing allows flexibility to issue
        debt promptly if the Corporation's needs and market
        conditions warrant.

    -   In February 1993, the Corporation issued $200 million
        of 7 7/8% Debentures due February 1, 2023.  The
        proceeds were used to reduce commercial paper
        borrowings. See Note 4 to the Financial Statements.

    -   Revolving credit facilities of $500 million are in
        place for general corporate purposes and to back up
        commercial paper borrowings.

    -   The Corporation's long-term debt securities have a
        Double-A rating, and its commercial paper is rated in
        the top category.

    -   Management believes that the Corporation's ability to
        generate cash from operations and its capacity to issue
        short-term and long-term debt are adequate to fund
        working capital, capital spending and other needs in
        the foreseeable future.

<PAGE>


TRENDS IN THE LAST THREE YEARS


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

Net Sales 

($ Billions)                                                           1993    1992   1991
- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                                                                   <C>     <C>    <C>
  Principal products:                                                         
    Diapers ......................................................... $ 1.5   $ 1.6  $ 1.6
    Household and other tissue-based products .......................   1.9     1.9    1.9
    Feminine care products ..........................................    .7      .7     .7
    All other .......................................................   2.9     2.9    2.6
                                                                      -----   -----  -----
  Consolidated ...................................................... $ 7.0   $ 7.1  $ 6.8
                                                                      =====   =====  =====

</TABLE>

    -   Consolidated net sales grew $.6 billion since 1990. 
        The increase was due to volume, partially offset by
        lower selling prices and changes in currency
        exchange rates in 1993.


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

Analysis of Operating Profit as a Percentage of Net Sales 


                                                                      1993      1992    1991
- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  <S>                                                                 <C>      <C>     <C>
  Net sales ......................................................... 100.0%   100.0%  100.0%
  Less:
   Cost of products sold ............................................  65.7     63.9    63.9
   Marketing expense ................................................  15.3     17.7    17.7
   Research expense .................................................   2.3      2.2     2.2
   General expense ..................................................   5.3      5.0     5.3
   Restructuring charge .............................................     -      3.5       - 
                                                                      -----    -----   -----

  Operating profit ..................................................  11.4%     7.7%   10.9%
                                                                      =====    =====   =====
</TABLE>


    Excluding the 1992 restructuring charge, operating profit
    margins have increased during the last two years as a
    result of higher sales volumes, improved manufacturing
    efficiencies, cost control measures, lower raw material
    costs, and lower marketing expenses which more than offset
    lower selling prices in 1993.  Other factors affecting
    operating profit margins for the last three years were:

        -   higher product improvement and start-up costs,
            particularly in 1993, 

        -   higher than historical marketing expenses in 1992
            and 1991,

        -   lower net price realizations for newsprint in 1992
            and continuing in 1993, 

        -   poor results for consumer and industrial bathroom
            tissue businesses in North America and Continental
            Europe in the past two years, and

        -   litigation settlements in 1993 and 1992.


<PAGE>


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>

Changes in Net Sales and Earnings versus the Preceding Year 

                                                                            1993    1992 
- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  <S>                                                                     <C>      <C>
  Net sales ............................................................  -  1.7%  + 4.6%
  Gross profit .........................................................  -  6.5   + 4.6
  Operating profit .....................................................  + 46.1   -26.8
  Income before cumulative effects of accounting changes ...............  + 48.1   -32.1
  Net income ...........................................................  +278.4   -73.4
  Per share basis:
   Income before cumulative effects of accounting changes ..............  + 47.9   -32.4
   Net income ..........................................................  +278.6   -73.6

</TABLE>


    -   The decline in net sales in 1993 was a result of lower
        selling prices and currency translation as previously
        discussed.  The increase in 1992 primarily was a result
        of higher sales volumes.

    -   Gross profit declined in 1993, principally because of
        the lower selling prices.  It grew in 1992, primarily
        as a result of higher sales volumes.

    -   Excluding the effect of the 1992 restructuring charge,
        operating profit grew .1 percent in 1993 and
        6.9 percent in 1992.  Factors affecting 1993 operating
        profit have been discussed previously.  The 1992
        improvement was primarily attributable to the higher
        sales volumes and improved operating efficiencies at
        certain manufacturing facilities, partially offset by
        higher marketing expenses.

    -   Excluding the 1992 restructuring charge, income before
        cumulative effects of accounting changes declined 1.2
        percent in 1993 and grew 1.7 percent in 1992.  On a per
        share basis, it declined 1.2 percent in 1993 and grew
        1.3 percent in 1992.

    -   The effective income tax rate declined to 39.9 percent
        in 1993 after increasing to 40.3 percent in 1992 from
        34.5 percent in 1991.  The higher effective income tax
        rates in the last two years were primarily caused by
        operating losses in certain non-U.S. operations for
        which no income tax benefits were recognized, the 1993
        U.S. tax rate increase and 1991 tax effects from the
        disposition of a subsidiary, as discussed below.

    -   Spruce Falls Power and Paper Company, a former 50.5-
        percent-owned Canadian newsprint subsidiary, was
        disposed of in the fourth quarter of 1991.  The
        transaction benefited 1991 net income by $20.0 million,
        or $.13 per share. 

    -   Share of net income of equity companies increased in
        the last three years, especially at Kimberly-Clark de
        Mexico, S.A. de C.V., which benefited primarily from
        higher sales volumes and from higher selling prices in
        1993.
          

ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS

During 1993, legislation was introduced in the United States
Congress and certain states requiring the inclusion of
secondary fiber in newsprint and certain other paper products. 
No such legislation was enacted that had or is expected to have
a material adverse effect on the Corporation's business.  It is
believed that similar legislation will be introduced in 1994 in
the United States Congress and certain states.  The Corporation
is unable to determine the effect, if any, which such
legislation, if enacted, would have on its business or on its
consolidated financial condition or results of operations. 

The Corporation is subject to federal, state and local
environmental protection laws and regulations with respect to
its business operations and is operating in compliance with, or
taking action aimed at ensuring compliance with, such laws and
regulations. Compliance with these laws and regulations is not
expected to materially affect the Corporation's business or
competitive position.  Management does not believe that the
Corporation has been identified as a potentially responsible
party at an Environmental Protection Agency-designated cleanup
site which could have a material adverse impact on the
Corporation's business or results of operations.  Additional
information concerning environmental matters is disclosed in
the Corporation's annual report to the Securities and Exchange
Commission on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 1993
under the "Business" and "Legal Proceedings" sections.


OUTLOOK - 1994 

Management expects more intense competition in its disposable
training pants business in 1994 due, in part, to an anticipated
wider distribution of a training pants product by a major
competitor in the U.S.  At this time, management is unable to
determine the effect of this competition on its future results
of operations.  Management also expects to continue to invest
heavily to support the Corporation's introduction of training
pants in Europe and its 1994 launch of diapers there.  

Beginning in 1993, management took steps to exit businesses
that do not meet its strategic objectives of building on the
Corporation's core technologies, well-known trademarks and
strong product franchises.  The assets of the Corporation's
Karolton Envelope business were sold in 1993, and the sale of
the Corporation's adhesive-coated label stock business is
pending.  Management expects to continue to review all of its
businesses to determine their ability to meet strategic
objectives.  Those businesses that are unable to meet these
objectives may become candidates for divestiture.

CONSOLIDATED SUBSIDIARIES


The following list includes companies which were more than 50
percent owned directly or indirectly by Kimberly-Clark
Corporation, a Delaware corporation, Dallas, Texas, as of
December 31, 1993.  Each company was owned 100 percent by
Kimberly-Clark Corporation unless otherwise indicated.

This list includes all significant subsidiaries.  The place of
incorporation is the same as the location of the company except
as shown parenthetically.  The fiscal year for all companies
ends December 31.

Astral Aviation, Inc. (Delaware) Milwaukee, Wisconsin (100% by
Midwest Express Airlines, Inc.)

Avent, Inc. and subsidiary (Delaware) Tucson, Arizona

Avent, S.A. de C.V. (Mexico City) Nogales, Mexico

Jet Professionals, Inc. (Delaware) Fairfield, Connecticut (100%
by K-C Aviation Inc.)

K-C Advertising, Inc. (Delaware) Neenah, Wisconsin

K-C Aviation Inc. (Delaware) Dallas, Texas

K-C do Brasil Ltda. and subsidiary, Sao Paulo, Brazil

Kimberly-Clark Argentina S.A., Cordoba, Argentina

Kimberly-Clark Benelux Operations B.V. and subsidiary,
Veenendaal, Netherlands

Kimberly-Clark Canada European Finance B.V., Netherlands (100%
by Kimberly-Clark Canada Inc.)

Kimberly-Clark Canada Global Finance N.V., Netherlands Antilles
(100% by Kimberly-Clark Canada Inc.)

Kimberly-Clark Canada Inc., Mississauga, Ontario, Canada

Kimberly-Clark de Centro America, S.A. and subsidiaries, Sitio
del Nino, El Salvador (39.6% plus 35.4% by Kimberly-Clark
International, S.A.)

Kimberly-Clark Costa Rica, Cartago, Costa Rica

Kimberly-Clark Far East Pte. Limited, Singapore (60% by
Kimberly-Clark International, S.A.)

Kimberly-Clark Forest Products Inc., Terrace Bay, Ontario,
Canada (100% by Kimberly-Clark Canada Inc.)

Kimberly-Clark France S.A.R.L., Paris, France

Kimberly-Clark GmbH and subsidiaries, Koblenz, Germany

Kimberly-Clark Inc., Mississauga, Ontario, Canada (100% by
Kimberly-Clark Canada Inc.)

Kimberly-Clark Industries S.A., Paris, France (100%* by
Kimberly-Clark France S.A.R.L.)

Kimberly-Clark Integrated Services Corporation (Delaware)
Roswell, Georgia

Kimberly-Clark International, S.A., Panama City, Panama

Kimberly-Clark International Services Corporation (Delaware)
Neenah, Wisconsin

Kimberly-Clark Limited, Larkfield, Kent, England

Kimberly-Clark PHC International, Inc. (Delaware)

Kimberly-Clark Philippines Inc., Makati, Philippines (87%*)

Kimberly-Clark Puerto Rico, Inc. (Delaware) San Juan, Puerto
Rico

Kimberly-Clark Sales Corporation (Virgin Islands) Veenendaal,
Netherlands

Kimberly-Clark Sopalin S.A., St. Cloud, France (100%* by
Kimberly-Clark France S.A.R.L.)

Kimberly-Clark Technical Products, Inc. (Delaware) Roswell,
Georgia

Kimberly-Clark Thailand Limited, Bangkok, Thailand

LTR Industries S.A., Paris, France (72%*)

Midwest Express Airlines, Inc. (Delaware) Milwaukee, Wisconsin
(100% by K-C Aviation Inc.)

Papeteries de Malaucene S.A., Malaucene, France (100%* by
Papeteries de Mauduit S.A.)

Papeteries de Mauduit S.A., Quimperle, France (100%* by
Kimberly-Clark France S.A.R.L.)

Ridgeway Insurance Company Limited*, Hamilton, Bermuda

Spenco Medical Corporation and subsidiary, Waco, Texas

SYZYGY, Inc. (Delaware) Waco, Texas

Venekim, C.A., Caracas, Venezuela (20% by Kimberly-Clark
International, S.A., 10% by Colombiana Kimberly S.A. and 70% by
Colombiana Universal de Papeles S.A.)

YuHan-Kimberly, Limited, Seoul, Korea (60%)


EQUITY COMPANIES


The following list includes companies which were 20 percent to
50 percent owned directly or indirectly by Kimberly-Clark
Corporation, a Delaware corporation, Dallas, Texas, as of
December 31, 1993.  Kimberly-Clark's percentage ownership of
each company is indicated parenthetically.

This list includes all significant equity companies.  The place
of incorporation is the same as the location of the company. 
The fiscal year for all companies ends December 31.


Colombiana Kimberly S.A., Medellin, Colombia (Approximately
50%*)

Colombiana Universal de Papeles S.A., Pereira, Colombia
(Approximately 50%*)

Kimberly-Clark Australia Pty. Limited and subsidiaries, Milsons
Point, New South Wales, Australia (50%)

Kimberly-Clark Malaysia, Sendirian Berhad, Petaling Jaya,
Malaysia (30.6%)

Kimberly-Clark de Mexico, S.A. de C.V. and subsidiaries, Mexico
City, Mexico (43%)

Olayan Kimberly-Clark Arabia Company, Al-Khobar, Kingdom of
Saudi Arabia (49%)

Olayan Kimberly-Clark (Bahrain) WLL, Manama, Bahrain (49%)

P.T. Kimsari Paper Indonesia, Medan, Indonesia (50%)




* Less qualifying shares held by directors, trustees or agents
  of the Corporation




DIVIDENDS AND DIVIDEND REINVESTMENT PLAN

Quarterly dividends have been paid continually since 1935. 
Dividends are paid on or about the second day of January,
April, July and October.  The Automatic Dividend Reinvestment
service of The First National Bank of Boston is available to
Kimberly-Clark stockholders of record.  The service makes it
possible for Kimberly-Clark stockholders of record to have
their dividends automatically reinvested in common stock and to
make additional cash investments up to $3,000 per quarter.

STOCK EXCHANGES

Kimberly-Clark common stock is listed on the New York, Chicago
and Pacific stock exchanges.  The ticker symbol is KMB.

TRADEMARKS

The brand names mentioned in this report -- Kleenex(R),
Huggies(R), Pull-Ups(R), Kotex(R), Lightdays(R), New
Freedom(R), Maximums(TM), Depend(R), EasyGrip(TM), Poise(R),
Hi-Dri(R), Delsey(R), Kimguard(R), Kleenex Softique(R),
Kleenex(R) Ultra(TM), Kleenex UltraSoft(TM), Kleenex
Boutique(R), Velvet(TM), Spenco(R), Silicore(R), Kimguard One-
Step(TM), Ultra(TM), Kimwipes(R), Classic(R) and Classic
Crest(R), Regard(R), Surpass(R), WorkHorse(R), Evolution(R),
Flexus(TM), Demique(R), Kimbies(R), KleenBebe(R), Brevia(R),
Midwest Express(R) and "The Best Care in the Air"(R) -- are
trademarks of Kimberly-Clark Corporation or its subsidiaries.





                                                   Exhibit No. (23)



INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' CONSENT


We consent to the incorporation by reference in Kimberly-Clark
Corporation's Registration Statements on Form S-8 (Nos. 2-
71743, 33-5299, 33-30425, 33-49050 and 33-58402) and on Form S-
3 (No. 33-52343) of our reports dated January 28,
1994, which reports include an explanatory paragraph concerning
the Corporation's changes in its methods of accounting for
income taxes and postretirement benefits other than pensions to
conform with Statements of Financial Accounting Standards No.
109 and No. 106, respectively; appearing in and incorporated by
reference in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended
December 31, 1993.  We also consent to the references to us
under the heading "Experts" in the Prospectuses, which are part
of such Registration Statements.

/s/ Deloitte & Touche
- ---------------------

DELOITTE & TOUCHE

Dallas, Texas
March 24, 1994





                                              Exhibit No. 24



                        POWER OF ATTORNEY

          KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned
does hereby constitute and appoint John W. Donehower, Randy J.
Vest and O. George Everbach, and each of them, with full power
to act alone, his true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent,
with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him and
in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to
sign Kimberly-Clark Corporation's Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1993 and to file the
same with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in
connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange
Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as
amended, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, and
each of them, full power and authority to do and perform each
and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done, as
fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in
person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said
attorneys-in-fact and agents or any one of them, or his
substitute or their substitutes, lawfully do or cause to be
done by virtue hereof.

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
seal this 17th day of February, 1994.


                                  /s/ John F. Bergstrom         
                                  -------------------------------
                                  John F. Bergstrom



STATE OF TEXAS   )
                 )  ss
COUNTY OF DALLAS )

          I, Clairene Jorella, a Notary Public in and for said
County, in the State aforesaid, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that John F.
Bergstrom is personally known to me to be the same person whose
name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument, appeared before
me this day in person, and acknowledged that he signed, sealed
and delivered the said instrument as his free and voluntary
act, for the uses and purposes therein set forth.

          GIVEN under my hand and notarial seal this 17th day of
February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Clairene Jorella          
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Clairene Jorella
                                  Notary Public


My commission expires:  July 30, 1997

<PAGE>


                        POWER OF ATTORNEY

          KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned
does hereby constitute and appoint John W. Donehower, Randy J.
Vest and O. George Everbach, and each of them, with full power
to act alone, his true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent,
with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him and
in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to
sign Kimberly-Clark Corporation's Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1993 and to file the
same with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in
connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange
Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as
amended, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, and
each of them, full power and authority to do and perform each
and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done, as
fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in
person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said
attorneys-in-fact and agents or any one of them, or his
substitute or their substitutes, lawfully do or cause to be
done by virtue hereof.

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
seal this 17th day of February, 1994.


                                  /s/ James D. Bernd            
                                  ------------------------------
                                  James D. Bernd


STATE OF TEXAS   )
                 )  ss
COUNTY OF DALLAS )

          I, Clairene Jorella, a Notary Public in and for said
County, in the State aforesaid, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that James D.
Bernd is personally known to me to be the same person whose
name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument, appeared before
me this day in person, and acknowledged that he signed, sealed
and delivered the said instrument as his free and voluntary
act, for the uses and purposes therein set forth.

          GIVEN under my hand and notarial seal this 17th day of
February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Clairene Jorella          
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Clairene Jorella
                                  Notary Public


My commission expires:  July 30, 1997

<PAGE>


                        POWER OF ATTORNEY

          KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned
does hereby constitute and appoint John W. Donehower, Randy J.
Vest and O. George Everbach, and each of them, with full power
to act alone, his true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent,
with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him and
in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to
sign Kimberly-Clark Corporation's Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1993 and to file the
same with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in
connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange
Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as
amended, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, and
each of them, full power and authority to do and perform each
and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done, as
fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in
person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said
attorneys-in-fact and agents or any one of them, or his
substitute or their substitutes, lawfully do or cause to be
done by virtue hereof.

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
seal this 17th day of February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Pastora San Juan Cafferty 
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Pastora San Juan Cafferty

STATE OF TEXAS   )
                 )  ss
COUNTY OF DALLAS )

          I, Clairene Jorella, a Notary Public in and for said
County, in the State aforesaid, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that Pastora
San Juan Cafferty is personally known to me to be the same
person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument,
appeared before me this day in person, and acknowledged that
she signed, sealed and delivered the said instrument as her
free and voluntary act, for the uses and purposes therein set
forth.

          GIVEN under my hand and notarial seal this 17th day of
February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Clairene Jorella          
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Clairene Jorella
                                  Notary Public


My commission expires:  July 30, 1997

<PAGE>


                        POWER OF ATTORNEY

          KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned
does hereby constitute and appoint John W. Donehower, Randy J.
Vest and O. George Everbach, and each of them, with full power
to act alone, his true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent,
with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him and
in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to
sign Kimberly-Clark Corporation's Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1993 and to file the
same with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in
connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange
Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as
amended, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, and
each of them, full power and authority to do and perform each
and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done, as
fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in
person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said
attorneys-in-fact and agents or any one of them, or his
substitute or their substitutes, lawfully do or cause to be
done by virtue hereof.

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
seal this 17th day of February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Paul J. Collins           
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Paul J. Collins


STATE OF TEXAS   )
                 )  ss
COUNTY OF DALLAS )

          I, Clairene Jorella, a Notary Public in and for said
County, in the State aforesaid, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that Paul J.
Collins is personally known to me to be the same person whose
name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument, appeared before
me this day in person, and acknowledged that he signed, sealed
and delivered the said instrument as his free and voluntary
act, for the uses and purposes therein set forth.

          GIVEN under my hand and notarial seal this 17th day of
February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Clairene Jorella          
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Clairene Jorella
                                  Notary Public


My commission expires:  July 30, 1997

<PAGE>


                        POWER OF ATTORNEY

          KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned
does hereby constitute and appoint John W. Donehower, Randy J.
Vest and O. George Everbach, and each of them, with full power
to act alone, his true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent,
with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him and
in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to
sign Kimberly-Clark Corporation's Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1993 and to file the
same with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in
connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange
Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as
amended, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, and
each of them, full power and authority to do and perform each
and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done, as
fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in
person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said
attorneys-in-fact and agents or any one of them, or his
substitute or their substitutes, lawfully do or cause to be
done by virtue hereof.

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
seal this 17th day of February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Claudio X. Gonzalez       
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Claudio X. Gonzalez


STATE OF TEXAS   )
                 )  ss
COUNTY OF DALLAS )

          I, Clairene Jorella, a Notary Public in and for said
County, in the State aforesaid, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that Claudio
X. Gonzalez is personally known to me to be the same person
whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument, appeared
before me this day in person, and acknowledged that he signed,
sealed and delivered the said instrument as his free and
voluntary act, for the uses and purposes therein set forth.

          GIVEN under my hand and notarial seal this 17th day of
February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Clairene Jorella          
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Clairene Jorella
                                  Notary Public


My commission expires:  July 30, 1997

<PAGE>


                        POWER OF ATTORNEY

          KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned
does hereby constitute and appoint John W. Donehower, Randy J.
Vest and O. George Everbach, and each of them, with full power
to act alone, his true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent,
with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him and
in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to
sign Kimberly-Clark Corporation's Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1993 and to file the
same with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in
connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange
Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as
amended, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, and
each of them, full power and authority to do and perform each
and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done, as
fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in
person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said
attorneys-in-fact and agents or any one of them, or his
substitute or their substitutes, lawfully do or cause to be
done by virtue hereof.

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
seal this 17th day of February, 1994.


                                  /s/ James G. Grosklaus        
                                  ------------------------------
                                  James G. Grosklaus


STATE OF TEXAS   )
                 )  ss
COUNTY OF DALLAS )

          I, Clairene Jorella, a Notary Public in and for said
County, in the State aforesaid, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that James G.
Grosklaus is personally known to me to be the same person whose
name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument, appeared before
me this day in person, and acknowledged that he signed, sealed
and delivered the said instrument as his free and voluntary
act, for the uses and purposes therein set forth.

          GIVEN under my hand and notarial seal this 17th day of
February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Clairene Jorella          
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Clairene Jorella
                                  Notary Public


My commission expires:  July 30, 1997

<PAGE>


                        POWER OF ATTORNEY

          KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned
does hereby constitute and appoint John W. Donehower, Randy J.
Vest and O. George Everbach, and each of them, with full power
to act alone, his true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent,
with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him and
in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to
sign Kimberly-Clark Corporation's Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1993 and to file the
same with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in
connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange
Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as
amended, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, and
each of them, full power and authority to do and perform each
and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done, as
fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in
person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said
attorneys-in-fact and agents or any one of them, or his
substitute or their substitutes, lawfully do or cause to be
done by virtue hereof.

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
seal this 17th day of February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Phala A. Helm, M.D.       
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Phala A. Helm, M.D.


STATE OF TEXAS   )
                 )  ss
COUNTY OF DALLAS )

          I, Clairene Jorella, a Notary Public in and for said
County, in the State aforesaid, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that Phala A.
Helm, M.D. is personally known to me to be the same person
whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument, appeared
before me this day in person, and acknowledged that she signed,
sealed and delivered the said instrument as her free and
voluntary act, for the uses and purposes therein set forth.

          GIVEN under my hand and notarial seal this 17th day of
February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Clairene Jorella          
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Clairene Jorella
                                  Notary Public


My commission expires:  July 30, 1997

<PAGE>


                        POWER OF ATTORNEY

          KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned
does hereby constitute and appoint John W. Donehower, Randy J.
Vest and O. George Everbach, and each of them, with full power
to act alone, his true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent,
with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him and
in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to
sign Kimberly-Clark Corporation's Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1993 and to file the
same with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in
connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange
Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as
amended, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, and
each of them, full power and authority to do and perform each
and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done, as
fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in
person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said
attorneys-in-fact and agents or any one of them, or his
substitute or their substitutes, lawfully do or cause to be
done by virtue hereof.

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
seal this 17th day of February, 1994.


                                  /s/ William E. LaMothe        
                                  ------------------------------
                                  William E. LaMothe


STATE OF TEXAS   )
                 )  ss
COUNTY OF DALLAS )

          I, Clairene Jorella, a Notary Public in and for said
County, in the State aforesaid, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that William
E. LaMothe is personally known to me to be the same person
whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument, appeared
before me this day in person, and acknowledged that he signed,
sealed and delivered the said instrument as his free and
voluntary act, for the uses and purposes therein set forth.

          GIVEN under my hand and notarial seal this 17th day of
February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Clairene Jorella          
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Clairene Jorella
                                  Notary Public


My commission expires:  July 30, 1997

<PAGE>


                        POWER OF ATTORNEY

          KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned
does hereby constitute and appoint John W. Donehower, Randy J.
Vest and O. George Everbach, and each of them, with full power
to act alone, his true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent,
with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him and
in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to
sign Kimberly-Clark Corporation's Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1993 and to file the
same with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in
connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange
Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as
amended, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, and
each of them, full power and authority to do and perform each
and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done, as
fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in
person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said
attorneys-in-fact and agents or any one of them, or his
substitute or their substitutes, lawfully do or cause to be
done by virtue hereof.

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
seal this 17th day of February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Louis E. Levy             
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Louis E. Levy


STATE OF TEXAS   )
                 )  ss
COUNTY OF DALLAS )

          I, Clairene Jorella, a Notary Public in and for said
County, in the State aforesaid, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that Louis E.
Levy is personally known to me to be the same person whose name
is subscribed to the foregoing instrument, appeared before me
this day in person, and acknowledged that he signed, sealed and
delivered the said instrument as his free and voluntary act,
for the uses and purposes therein set forth.

          GIVEN under my hand and notarial seal this 17th day of
February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Clairene Jorella          
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Clairene Jorella
                                  Notary Public


My commission expires:  July 30, 1997

<PAGE>


                        POWER OF ATTORNEY

          KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned
does hereby constitute and appoint John W. Donehower, Randy J.
Vest and O. George Everbach, and each of them, with full power
to act alone, his true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent,
with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him and
in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to
sign Kimberly-Clark Corporation's Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1993 and to file the
same with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in
connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange
Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as
amended, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, and
each of them, full power and authority to do and perform each
and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done, as
fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in
person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said
attorneys-in-fact and agents or any one of them, or his
substitute or their substitutes, lawfully do or cause to be
done by virtue hereof.

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
seal this 25th day of February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Frank A. McPherson        
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Frank A. McPherson


STATE OF OKLAHOMA  )
                   )  ss
COUNTY OF OKLAHOMA )

          I, Jennine L. Mashburn, a Notary Public in and for
said County, in the State aforesaid, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that
Frank A. McPherson is personally known to me to be the same
person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument,
appeared before me this day in person, and acknowledged that he
signed, sealed and delivered the said instrument as his free
and voluntary act, for the uses and purposes therein set forth.

          GIVEN under my hand and notarial seal this 25th day of
February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Jennine L. Mashburn       
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Jennine L. Mashburn
                                  Notary Public


My commission expires: May 15, 1994

<PAGE>


                        POWER OF ATTORNEY

          KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned
does hereby constitute and appoint John W. Donehower, Randy J.
Vest and O. George Everbach, and each of them, with full power
to act alone, his true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent,
with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him and
in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to
sign Kimberly-Clark Corporation's Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1993 and to file the
same with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in
connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange
Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as
amended, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, and
each of them, full power and authority to do and perform each
and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done, as
fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in
person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said
attorneys-in-fact and agents or any one of them, or his
substitute or their substitutes, lawfully do or cause to be
done by virtue hereof.

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
seal this 17th day of February, 1994.


                                  /s/ H. Blair White            
                                  ------------------------------
                                  H. Blair White


STATE OF TEXAS   )
                 )  ss
COUNTY OF DALLAS )

          I, Clairene Jorella, a Notary Public in and for said
County, in the State aforesaid, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that H. Blair
White is personally known to me to be the same person whose
name is subscribed to the foregoing instrument, appeared before
me this day in person, and acknowledged that he signed, sealed
and delivered the said instrument as his free and voluntary
act, for the uses and purposes therein set forth.

          GIVEN under my hand and notarial seal this 17th day of
February, 1994.


                                  /s/ Clairene Jorella          
                                  ------------------------------
                                  Clairene Jorella
                                  Notary Public


My commission expires:  July 30, 1997